National Weather Service

Single Digit Temps Are Here, Bundle Up

Jan 2, 2014
National Weather Service

UPDATED MONDAY JAN. 6:

There was little of the predicted snowfall throughout the region last night. But that didn’t stop the cold. The National Weather Service reports a wind chill advisory for much of western Kentucky and southern Illinois. The advisory will stay in affect until 9 a.m. Tuesday.

A wind chill advisory means that very cold air and strong winds will combine to generate wind chills of 10 below zero to 25 below zero. This will result in frostbite and lead to hypothermia if precautions are not taken.

The NHS warns if you must venture outdoors wear a hat and gloves.

According to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet the lack of snow does not mean the roads are unaffected. With rain dampened road surfaces crews are concerned about dropping temperatures causing moisture to flash freeze in 30 minutes or less. Drivers are urged to use caution. 

National Weather Service Forecasters are revising their forecast for this weekend's winter storm and extreme cold.

Rain will change to snow from northwest to southeast across the area from late tonight through early Sunday afternoon. Periods of heavy snowfall are expected with accumulations ranging from 5 to 10 inches over southeast Missouri, southern Illinois and southwest Indiana.

Two to five inches can be expected over west Kentucky. A Winter Storm Warning has been issued for much of the area, and a Winter Storm Watch remains in effect for southeast portions of west Kentucky.

Brutally cold air will surge southeast through the region on the strength of gusty northwest winds Sunday afternoon through Monday. Temperatures will be below zero over much of the area from Sunday night through early Tuesday, and wind chills will generally range from 10 below to 30 below zero during this period.

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The National Weather Service is predicting widespread heavy rainfall this weekend with a possibility of severe thunderstorms.

A flash flood watch takes effect tonight at 6PM and lasts through 6AM on Sunday for most of our listening area.  

The NWS is predicting heavy rainfall Friday evening after 10PM with wind gusts upwards of 20 miles per hour.

The heaviest rainfall is predicted for Saturday with 2 to 4 inches expected along with a chance of severe thunderstorms in the late afternoon and evening with wind gusts near 30 miles-per-hour.

John Paul Henry

  

UPDATE: The Illinois State Police held a press conference at 10:30 this morning. The National Weather Service's Rick Shanklin addressed the press saying three crews are surveying damage in southern Illinois to get an estimate on the strength of some of the tornadoes that struck the community. 

Nearly all of our region is now under a MODERATE to HIGH Risk today.

The National Weather Service has issued a tornado watch until 7 tonight  for all Kentucky counties west of Daviess, McLean, and Muhlenberg.  The watch area also includes Alexander, Massac, Pope, Johnson, and Pulaski counties in southernmost Illinois as well as Henry, Obion, Dyer, Lake, and Weakley counties in northwest Tennessee.

The watch is the result of a strong storm system rapidly moving east through our region out of the plains states.  This system will also bring high winds gusting up to 40 miles an hour and a chance of large hail.

A tornado watch means conditions are favorable for the formation of tornadoes in the area.  Be ready to move to a safe place if threatening weather approaches.  Again we have a tornado watch in effect for our region until 7 tonight.  We'll keep you updated as the situation develops.

 See details on the National Weather Service Paducah site.

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National Weather Service forecasters in Paducah say strong storms are likely ahead of a significant cold front that will move through the region Saturday night and Sunday.  

A powerful storm moved through parts of northern Calloway County early Thursday afternoon, generating a possible downburst near Kirksey that damaged more than 20 structures, leveled about 50 trees, and brought down several power lines.

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Moderate flooding is expected near Cairo, IL as the Mississippi and Illinois rivers crests this week, but the National Weather Service said the risk of spring flooding will continue for the next several weeks.

The moderate flooding prediction comes two years after historic flooding throughout many of far western Kentucky's river counties.

NWS Meteorologist Rachel Trevino in Paducah said rainfall and snow north of western Kentucky and southern Illinois along with future storm cells could all contribute to the rising river levels.

“The flooding going on up north of us due to rainfall and the snow packs and stuff probably will kind of affect us down in this area probably in the next two or three weeks," she said. " It will take that long for that water to get down here.”

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The National Weather Service is issuing flood warnings in Kentucky and Tennessee as the Mississippi River starts to slowly rise from northern floodwaters, but officials say the rising water should not have a significant impact.

NWS Meteorologist Marlene Mickelson in Memphis says the lower part of the Mississippi River will see elevated levels through the next two weeks.

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National Weather Service forecasters say a line of storms moving in out of the west this afternoon will bring a moderate risk of severe thunderstorms, damaging winds, hail, and tornadoes lasting into the evening.

Severe Weather Coming to Region

Apr 17, 2013
NWS

Severe weather is expected across the region over the next 48 hours.

The national weather service has issued a severe thunderstorm watch through 9:00pm for the  WKMS listening area. A wind advisory will also be in effect beginning at 1:00am.

Forecasters expect a second line of storms to reach the area in late afternoon tomorrow. The storms should last late into the night. Forecasters say the conditions will be favorable for high winds, hail and tornadoes. Rainfall totals are expected to be 1 to 2 inches. 

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