National Corvette Museum

National Corvette Museum, via Facebook

Tributes to the life and music of Prince are pouring in from all over the world following the pop superstar’s sudden death Thursday. Prince is being remembered in Bowling Green for a song he wrote more than 33 years ago.

National Corvette Museum

The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green is marking the second anniversary of a sinkhole collapse with a new multimedia exhibit. 

Work crews are prepping the Skydome at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green for reopening in July. 

Construction began last November in an area where eight prized cars fell into a massive sinkhole in February 2014. 

The hole was filled with crushed limestone and flooring supports were added underneath to prevent future collapses.

"If there were ever a future collapse of any kind, the floor is not going to go anywhere, it will stay in place," says NCM Marketing and Communications Director Katie Frassinelli.  "After that, they've been installing guardrail around the perimeter of room, cleaning, and painting."

The $5 million project converted the Skydome from two levels to one and added more display space. 

Once complete, all eight Corvettes will return to the Skydome.  Three of the cars were restored by General Motors.  The other five were too mangled for restoration.

A new sinkhole exhibit will open in the fall.

National Corvette Museum, Facebook,

Thursday marks the one-year anniversary of the day a sinkhole opened up beneath the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, swallowing up eight vintage vehicles. While the sinkhole damaged the facility, it also led to a spike in attention and attendance at the museum. 

General Motors says it is delaying shipments of thousands of 2015 Corvettes and telling dealerships that already have the new models to stop selling them for the time being.  A spokesperson at the Bowling Green Assembly Plant says two safety issues are at the heart of the decision.

One issue concerns rear parking brake cables, the other with the part used to connect the airbag and steering wheel.

Bill Visnic, senior analyst with says the entire auto industry, not just GM, has learned lessons in the last year about disclosing potential safety problems.

“There’s definitely erring on the side of caution in this case,” said Visnic. “But at the same time, it’s just more-or-less simply the right thing to do, particularly when you’re talking about a high-performance model where someone might be using the car in fairly extreme conditions, you want to make sure you have all the requisite safety items where you need them to be.”

Abbey Oldham

Engineers expect to start pulling out Corvettes from a Bowling Green sinkhole next week.

Eight vintage versions of the car fell into the sinkhole that opened up two weeks ago beneath the National Corvette Museum. 

National Corvette Museum


A team of experts assembled Thrusday at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green.  They’re developing a plan for stabilizing the Skydome where eight cars fell into a sinkhole Wednesday. 

Museum Director Wendell Strode isn’t sure when the cars will be removed.