Nathan Bedford Forrest

Thomas R Machnitzki, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

The removal of three statues of Confederate leaders from public parks in Memphis, Tennessee, did not violate state law because they were on private property when they were torn down, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Thomas R Machnitzki, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

The Republican-dominated House in Tennessee voted Tuesday to punish the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments by taking $250,000 away from the city that would have been used for a bicentennial celebration next year.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

A Confederate statue on private property along an interstate in Tennessee has been painted pink in the latest act of vandalism there. 

It was a long time in the making, but when the statues of Confederate figures finally came down in Memphis, Tenn., it was quick work.

On Wednesday, the city sold two of its city parks – one with a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, the other featuring a statue of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest on horseback — for $1,000 each.

Wasin Pummarin, 123RF Stock Photo

A bid by Tennessee's governor to remove a bust of Confederate cavalry general and early Ku Klux Klan leader Nathan Bedford Forrest from the state Capitol building has been rejected.

Wasin Pummarin/123rf Stock Photo

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's call to remove a bust of a Confederate cavalry general and early Ku Klux Klan leader Nathan Bedford Forrest from the state Capitol building is getting its first hearing this week.

Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers in Tennessee say they were tricked into voting for a resolution honoring a Confederate general, slave trader and early Ku Klux Klan leader, and they're denouncing it.

Wikimedia Commons

On March 25, 1864, Confederate cavalry leader Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest launched a successful raid on Paducah, quickly occupying the town, recruiting soldiers, and stripping supplies and horses from the Union troops, forcing Union leader Col. Stephen G. Hicks to withdraw to the west end of the town. Paducah Tilghman House Director Bill Baxter speaks with Todd Hatton on Sounds Good about the battle on the eve of its Sesquicentennial.

Postmark Commemorating Kentucky Battle

Apr 20, 2012
Wikimedia Commons

A special postmark is being issued as part of the re-enactment of the Civil War Battle of Sacramento in western Kentucky. The U.S. Postal Service will offer the postmark starting Tuesday as part of a series of commemorations marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, which took place from 1861 to 1865. The postmark will be available at a log cabin near the battlegrounds in Sacramento. The Battle of Sacramento took place on December 28, 1861 between Union Major Eli H. Murray and Confederate Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest.