NAACP

Members of Paducah’s NAACP chapter and the Community Clergy Fellowship held a press conference this week to voice their discontent with Paducah Public School’s hiring procedures.

A rural West Tennessee community is pushing the Justice Department to reopen a 75-year-old civil rights murder case.

Elbert Williams is believed to be the first NAACP official killed for seeking to register black voters. Yet the mysterious story of his 1940 murder is not widely known.

Clues about Williams' murder are thought to be buried with him, here in the Taylor Cemetery just outside Brownsville, Tenn.

Local attorney Jim Emison walks to a corner of the cemetery, set off by two towering oaks.

"This is the area where we believe he lies," Emison says.

personnel.ky.gov

The NAACP writes on their Facebook page: "After tireless work and Congressional hearings that led to the Church Arson Prevention Act being passed in 1996 - almost 20 years later, we must again seek justice, investigate and find #WhoIsBurningBlackChurches. Six black churches have burned since the terrorist attack at Emanuel AME Church." Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights John Johnson was the youngest president of any NAACP chapter at the age of 18 and spent 20 years working at the national headquarters before his current position. He spoke with Kate Lochte last week before the funeral for victims of the Charleston shooting, about it being long past time for racism to exist and how he thinks law enforcement can improve practices in black communities.

racialtaboo.com

Be intentional. It isn't enough to feel in our minds a certain way about inqequality and injustice, but showing that feeling is so important, says Beth Khadem of the Paducah NAACP Racial Unity Group. She and Cal Ross, Executive Director of the Paducah Housing Authority, join Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about reinvigorating the group with racial unity efforts in Paducah, including film and discussion at Maiden Alley Cinema and a "Race Story Rewrite" all-day workshop in May.

50th Anniversary Civil Rights March on Frankfort

Jan 20, 2014
kchr.ky.gov

As a young man, shortly out of high school, John J. Johnson was the president of the local NAACP in his hometown of Franklin, Kentucky, and was a member of the executive committee for the March on Frankfort 50 years ago, which is being commemorated this year. That first march touched the nation and ultimately helped lead to the passage of the U.S. Civil Rights Act on July 2 of the same year. Today, John J. Johnson is the Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, and speaks with Kate Lochte.