Music Education

NPR Ed
5:14 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Amir Pinkney-Jengkens, 8, is learning trombone through Harmony Project, a nonprofit that provides musical instruments and instruction to children in low-income communities. Recent research suggests that such musical education may help improve kids' ability to process speech.
Annie Tritt for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 10:55 am

Musical training doesn't just improve your ear for music — it also helps your ear for speech. That's the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn't just get better at playing the trombone or violin; they found that playing music also helped kids' brains process language.

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Education
12:24 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Laynie Mitchell on the Importance of Early Childhood Music Education

Chad Lampe speaks with Laynie Mitchell about the importance of early childhood music education. Mitchell is Choir Director at Murray High School and an adjunct faculty member at Murray State University. She is offering a 4-week early childhood music class this summer on Thursdays in June at First Presbyterian Church in Murray. Classes start at 9 am. and cost $40. In the course overview, she writes, "In order to be fully developed individuals, all children should receive music instruction. Also music instruction received at an early age will make the greatest difference in terms of life-long music learning. The younger a child is immersed in an appropriate music environment, the better." Contact Laynie Mitchell at elaine.mitchell@murray.kyschools.us, or at 270-761-4804.

Click here to read the full course overview and Q&A. (Word)