mosquitoes

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

A pregnant woman is the third case of Zika virus in Kentucky, according the state’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

The woman from the Louisville area had recently traveled to Central America, where the virus is known to be circulating. She has since recovered from the illness, the state said. 

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

A Western Kentucky man has tested positive for Zika virus, according to the Kentucky Department of Public Health.

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

Gov. Matt Bevin and officials from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services discussed Kentucky’s first confirmed case of Zika virus on Thursday.

A Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results March 9. 

How Best To Test For Zika Virus?

Mar 10, 2016

Let's say you're a pregnant woman who recently traveled to Latin America or the Caribbean. You got a little sick shortly after the trip, with some combination of mild fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis. The big question now is: Did you have Zika virus? And, if so, is your fetus still healthy?

"Probably every day, patients come in questioning whether or not they would qualify for testing," says Dr. Christine Curry, an obstetrician-gynecologist at the University of Miami, and Jackson Memorial Hospital.

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky Department for Public Health has confirmed the state’s first case of Zika virus. A Louisville man who had recently been traveling in a Central American country tested positive for the virus, according to a press release from DPH. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the test results March 9.

Mosquitoes have a nasty reputation.

The species Aedes aegypti, for example, is currently responsible for spreading the Zika virus through the Americas and also infects humans with dengue fever, chikungunya and yellow fever.

This raises the question: Should there be an effort to get rid of Aedes aegypti for good?

There have, of course, been many thousands of species that are indeed gone for good. And a U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity has noted: "Every day, up to 150 species are lost."

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

The Zika virus cases in Central and South America are certainly getting attention in the U.S. Health officials at the University of Kentucky are offering some advice. 

Most of us will remember 2014 as the year Ebola came to the U.S. But another virus made its debut in the Western Hemisphere. And unlike Ebola, it's not leaving anytime soon.

The virus is called chikungunya: You pronounce it a bit like "chicken-goon-ya."

Chikun-What? A New Mosquito-Borne Virus Lands In The U.S.

Jul 3, 2014

Pediatrician Jennifer Halverson will never forget her 36th birthday.

The St. Paul native was volunteering at a maternity clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. She felt great — she went to her job that day and then out to dinner with friends.

But when she got home and went to sleep that night in May, something didn't feel right.

"Then I woke up at 3 in the morning," she says, "and what struck me the most was that my shoulders were on fire. It was like I was being stabbed in both shoulders."

Health officials in southern Illinois are on alert after a strain of the West Nile virus was detected in a mosquito trap sample in Massac County.

Southern Seven Environmental Health Director Brad Rendelman conducted the positive test earlier this month. 

Pages