Most of us will remember 2014 as the year Ebola came to the U.S. But another virus made its debut in the Western Hemisphere. And unlike Ebola, it's not leaving anytime soon.

The virus is called chikungunya: You pronounce it a bit like "chicken-goon-ya."

Chikun-What? A New Mosquito-Borne Virus Lands In The U.S.

Jul 3, 2014

Pediatrician Jennifer Halverson will never forget her 36th birthday.

The St. Paul native was volunteering at a maternity clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. She felt great — she went to her job that day and then out to dinner with friends.

But when she got home and went to sleep that night in May, something didn't feel right.

"Then I woke up at 3 in the morning," she says, "and what struck me the most was that my shoulders were on fire. It was like I was being stabbed in both shoulders."

Health officials in southern Illinois are on alert after a strain of the West Nile virus was detected in a mosquito trap sample in Massac County.

Southern Seven Environmental Health Director Brad Rendelman conducted the positive test earlier this month.

A means to control mosquito swarms this summer around Land Between the Lakes is a concern for an organic farmer that lives less that 10 miles from where the Department of Agriculture plans to spray.

Hillyard Farms owner Brad Lowe grows organic crops and raises cattle, hens and pigs in Murray. He says although the insecticide won’t have a direct effect on his farm, he is still concerned.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer will meet with local judge executives next Tuesday concerning this year’s increased mosquito levels.

Judge-executives from Calloway, Marshall, Lyon and Trigg counties sent a letter to the commissioner asking for aerial pesticide spraying. The commissioner responded by requesting an in-person meeting. 

NPR reports we have evolved to eat meat, but we might be going overboard with some dishes. 

Mosquitoes Could Come Out in Force This Year

Jun 25, 2012

Some experts are predicting one of the worst summers in decades for mosquitoes, but one University of Kentucky professor is taking a wait-and-see approach.