Mississippi River

Army Corps To Blow Up Rock Outcrops

Dec 12, 2012
KRCU

Two river navigation trade associations say the Army Corps of Engineers will blow up rock outcrops on the Mississippi River next week. The rock pinnacles in Thebes, Ill., could block river traffic after Christmas if water levels continue to fall. The rock removal is a half-victory for barge companies, who also want the Corps to release water from Missouri River reservoirs.

American Waterways Operators spokesperson Ann McColloch says the rock blasting project is welcome news, but adds the work will take an extended period of time.

Kelly Martin, Wikimedia Commons

A top Army Corps of Engineers official says an updated forecast means it’s unlikely the lower Mississippi River will close to shipping. Army Assistant Secretary Jo-Ellen Darcy tells interested state lawmakers the agency won't scale back the amount of Missouri River water it began withholding last month from the Mississippi. Lawmakers and the barge industry had sought the extra water to prevent a shipping crisis.

2008 National Park Service

Governor Steve Beshear is joining officials from other states asking the Army Corps of Engineers not to restrict the flow of the Missouri River into the Mississippi. The Corps says the flow reduction is due to drought in the upper Missouri River.

Kentucky U. S. Congressman Ed Whitfield has joined those calling on the Army Corps of Engineers to increase water flow on the Mississippi River. The Corps has reduced flow from the Missouri River into the Mississippi to preserve water reservoirs.

dorena-hickmanferryboat.com

Commercial trucks are not being allowed on a ferry that is the only route between Kentucky and Missouri. The detour is about 80 miles for trucks traveling between the two states. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says the Dorena-Hickman Ferry restriction is because of the low water level of the Mississippi River.

Kelly Martin, Wikimedia Commons

Lawmakers from several Mississippi River states are meeting with the Army Corps of Engineers today to address the waterway's critically low levels between St. Louis and Cairo .

2008 National Park Service

River navigation leaders want the Obama administration to take emergency action to avoid a river commerce shutdown. The Army Corps of Engineers is reducing flows on the Missouri River. That will drop Mississippi River levels by as much as four feet by Dec. 10.

The Waterways Council CEO Mike Toohey says the basic inputs of everyday life will not arrive at their destination if commerce is interrupted between St. Louis and Cairo, Illinois.

Corps of Engineers Moves Ahead with Missouri River Cutoff

Nov 23, 2012

The Army Corps of Engineers has begun reducing the flow from a Missouri River reservoir, a move expected to worsen low water conditions on the Mississippi River and potentially halt barge traffic at St. Louis within weeks.

Rose Krzton-Presson

A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decision to limit Missouri River's flow into the Mississippi has representatives of the barge industry worried. The Corps plans to cut the amount of water discharged at Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota by 30 percent because of concerns of another drought in the Midwest next summer.

Cates Landing Port to Open in 2013

Oct 15, 2012
Image from "Port of Cates Landing Tennessee Update"

Northwestern Tennessee's long-planned Cates Landing Mississippi river port is set to open in early spring. Tri-County Port Authority Chair Jimmy Williamson says final site work at the Lake County port begins in November after storm debris from 2011 flooding is cleared from the river. Williamson says the port will bring heavy use from the commercial barge industry to northwest Tennessee.

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