Mental health

Part One in an NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

You might call it a silent epidemic.

Up to one in five kids living in the U.S. shows signs or symptoms of a mental health disorder in a given year.

So in a school classroom of 25 students, five of them may be struggling with the same issues many adults deal with: depression, anxiety, substance abuse.

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A Boone County man wants a divorce, but hasn’t been able to get one because he is deemed mentally incompetent under the law.

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Mental health advocates presented Kentucky lawmakers with hours of testimony Wednesday about why the commonwealth needs a law allowing judges to order some people to get treatment.

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Legislation to mandate outpatient mental health treatment in Kentucky is going before the full House.  The measure won committee approval Thursday from the House Health and Welfare Committee.  Advocate Sheila Shuster says it would apply to people who have been involuntarily committed twice and don’t understand they have an illness.

Children of anxious parents are more at risk of developing an anxiety disorder. But there's welcome news for those anxious parents: that trajectory toward anxiety isn't set in stone.

Therapy and a change in parenting styles might be able to prevent kids from developing anxiety disorders, according to research published in The American Journal of Psychiatry Friday.

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The fit between the client and the therapist is really important, but finding a the right therapist doesn't have a clear answer because there is a lot of information to weigh, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri about ways to find a therapist you're comfortable talking to and willing to be honest with about what you're experiencing.

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African American women in the South’s rural areas are less likely to suffer from depression than those who live in Southern urban areas.  That’s according to a new study from the University of Michigan.  The study uses data from the National Survey of American Life to examine how poverty and low education affect mental illness in black and white women living in the rural South.  

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Western Kentucky is lacking mental health care providers according to the latest Robert Wood Johnson Foundation County Health Rankings.

Pennyroyal Center interim executive director Eric Embry said it’s difficult to attract mental health professionals in the mostly rural western Kentucky.

A new law that went into effect this week in Kentucky is changing the way the state views faith-based mental health counselors. Kentucky is now licensing such counselors, which means their services will be covered by insurance policies.

One of the faith-based counselors impacted by the new law is Joe Bob Pierce, who works with Cornerstone Counseling in Owensboro. He says the change in state law could encourage potential clients who might have been put off by having to foot the entire bill.

“Clients that otherwise might have to pay out-of-pocket to see a pastoral counselor now will be provided a bit of subsidy, or help, or in some cases their entire fee for counseling will be handled by the insurance company.”

Pierce’s counseling service is located inside Third Baptist Church in Owensboro. He says while many of his clients are deeply rooted in traditional Baptist beliefs, he has also counseled individuals who don’t claim any religious affiliation.

He says his clients are interested in receiving help from someone who will take into account the spiritual aspects of their lives,

“It may not necessarily be a dimension that is religious in terms of being attached to a particular faith. But I think it’s very much a part of our make-up as people.”

To be licensed by the state, pastoral counselors must have a master’s degree in the field and meet the same qualifications as other licensed counselors.

The UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Tennessee is giving $1 million in grants to increase housing for Tennesseans with mental illness. Officials say the funding will help support development of appropriate housing for people who need a place to live after being discharged from a mental health facility.

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