medicaid

Senate Republicans' latest plan to overhaul the U.S. health care system ends with a massive shift of federal money from states that expanded Medicaid — and are largely dominated by Democrats — to those that refused to expand.

The Trump administration says many of the organizations that help people enroll in health plans on the federal insurance marketplaces don't provide enough bang for the buck, sometimes costing thousands of dollars to sign up each customer. So it is cutting their funding, some by as much as 90 percent, the government told the groups last week.

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New data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows Kentucky led the nation with the largest decrease of people without insurance since the implementation of former President Barack Obama's health care law.

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A former dentistry professor says members of Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration pressured University of Kentucky officials to fire him after he wrote a critique of the governor’s plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid system.

Healthy Debate: What The Republican Health Bill Taught Us About Medicaid

Jul 24, 2017

As the Senate nears a vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, some Ohio Valley lawmakers and residents are increasingly uneasy with the potential effects. Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia are highly dependent on Medicaid, and proposed changes could have bigger effects here than almost anywhere else in the country. The Ohio Valley ReSource has an analysis of how the heated debate has shed light on the region’s health concerns.

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Medicaid advocates, family members and policy experts gathered in Frankfort Monday to weigh in on proposed changes to the state-run insurance program for low-income and disabled people.

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The first of two public hearings seeking input on Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin’s Medicaid waiver is Friday in Somerset.

Natalia Merzlyakova, 123rf Stock Photo

  A new report out from the left-leaning Commonwealth Fund finds more than 32,000 jobs could be lost in Kentucky by 2026 if the U.S. Senate passes its proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Most of those jobs would be in healthcare, but the report found other fields, like real estate, could also be hit.

This week, as senators have decamped from Washington for the Fourth of July recess, the future of the Senate's Affordable Care Act replacement plan — and by extension, Medicaid — remains uncertain.

No corner of the health care system would be harder hit than Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor, if Republican leaders in Congress round up the votes to repeal major portions of the Affordable Care Act.

GOP lawmakers have proposed winding down the Medicaid expansion that added 17 million people in 31 states and the District of Columbia under the ACA, and also eventually capping the program's spending per capita.

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