medicaid

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U.S. Congressman James Comer of Kentucky's 1st District says the new Congressional Budget Office analysis of the Republican healthcare plan shows lower insurance premiums and a reduction of the federal deficit.

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A health advocacy group in Kentucky is reacting to the health care plan approved by the Republican-controlled U.S. House. The bill dismantles core aspects of the Affordable Care Act, including the employer and individual mandates.

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A Kentucky doctor convicted of Medicaid fraud has been sentenced to five years in prison and ordered to pay more than $10,000 in restitution.

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A plan by Tennessee Democrats to expand the Medicaid program in the state has died after the sponsor of the measure pulled the bill for the year.

If you're poor and you want to keep your health insurance, you may have to go to work.

That's the message from Republican lawmakers who Monday night released a series of changes to their plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

A key change, designed to help attract votes from conservative Republicans, would let state governors require people to work to qualify for health insurance under Medicaid.

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One Republican senator is already rallying opposition to the House GOP's new plan to replace President Barack Obama's health law. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky calls the plan "Obamacare Lite." 

In recent days, several Republican lawmakers have faced crowds of constituents at town hall meetings around the country who are angry that they may be in danger of losing their health coverage.

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The vast majority of Kentucky’s Medicaid recipients are eligible for the program because of the 2013 expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

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  “Medicaid block grant.”

You might’ve heard this term in the past few days. Republican members of Congress have touted the health care idea for many years. But it wasn’t until this weekend — when a top aide to President Donald Trump endorsed it — that the term really turned heads.

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Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration is moving forward with a plan that would alter the state’s expanded Medicaid system, even if the Affordable Care Act is repealed or replaced by Congress.

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