medicaid

Why Do So Many People Hate Obamacare So Much?

Dec 13, 2017

The Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has roiled America since the day it was signed into law in 2010. From the start, the public was almost evenly divided between those who supported it and those who opposed it.

They still are. The November monthly tracking poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 50 percent of those polled had a favorable view of the health law, while 46 percent viewed it unfavorably.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Kentucky’s Medicaid commissioner says federal officials are “real close” to approving Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed changes to the state’s Medicaid system.

As the administration and Republicans in Congress look to scale back Medicaid, many voters and state lawmakers across the country are moving to make it bigger.

On Tuesday, Maine voters approved a ballot measure to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Advocates are looking to follow suit with ballot measures in Utah, Missouri and Idaho in 2018.

rido, 123rf Stock Photo

The insurance program that provides health insurance to almost a third of Kentuckians — Medicaid — will soon change. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin is awaiting approval from the federal government on his proposed reforms. But even if Bevin gets everything he asked for, Medicaid providers and advocates say there are still a lot of unknowns to how Kentucky will manage the program.

Starting next week, Americans will again be able to shop for health plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces. Open enrollment in most states runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15.

Natalia Merzlyakova 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky officials say they expect the Trump administration to approve the state's request to overhaul its Medicaid program. 

Luca Bertolli/123rf Stock Photo

State officials say too many people are getting disability benefits in Kentucky, citing a new state report that shows disability enrollment has far outpaced the state’s population growth over the last 35 years.

Iowa is one of 38 states that radically changed the way it runs Medicaid over the past few years. The state moved about 600,000 people on the government-run health program into care that is managed by for-profit insurance companies.

The idea is that the private companies would save the state money, but it has been a rocky transition in Iowa, especially for people like Neal Siegel.

belchonock, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky regulators say they’ll go to court to keep from handing over documents related to the state’s plan to reconfigure its Medicaid insurance program. But legal experts say Kentucky’s argument — that it doesn’t have to turn over emails and other communications because they are preliminary and about negotiations — doesn’t hold up.

Natalia Merzlyakova 123rf stock photo

  The Hopkinsville-Christian County League Of Women Voters held a forum this week with health care experts from different backgrounds to tackle why health costs are rising in the U.S.

Pages