medicaid

If you're poor and you want to keep your health insurance, you may have to go to work.

That's the message from Republican lawmakers who Monday night released a series of changes to their plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

A key change, designed to help attract votes from conservative Republicans, would let state governors require people to work to qualify for health insurance under Medicaid.

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One Republican senator is already rallying opposition to the House GOP's new plan to replace President Barack Obama's health law. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky calls the plan "Obamacare Lite." 

In recent days, several Republican lawmakers have faced crowds of constituents at town hall meetings around the country who are angry that they may be in danger of losing their health coverage.

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The vast majority of Kentucky’s Medicaid recipients are eligible for the program because of the 2013 expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

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  “Medicaid block grant.”

You might’ve heard this term in the past few days. Republican members of Congress have touted the health care idea for many years. But it wasn’t until this weekend — when a top aide to President Donald Trump endorsed it — that the term really turned heads.

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Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration is moving forward with a plan that would alter the state’s expanded Medicaid system, even if the Affordable Care Act is repealed or replaced by Congress.

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More than 74,000 Kentuckians have signed up for health insurance through HealthCare.gov as of January 14. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released the numbers Wednesday. 

To get a glimpse of where Medicaid may be headed after Donald Trump moves into the White House, it may be wise to look to Indiana.

That's where Seema Verma, Trump's pick to run the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, comes from. And that's where she put her stamp on the state's health care program for the poor.

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A faculty member at the University of Louisville School of Medicine has been appointed medical director for the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services.  

Dr. Gil Liu will oversee clinical decisions for the Commonwealth’s Medicaid program which covers over a million Kentuckians.  

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Kentucky Treasurer Allison Ball says the state is offering special bank accounts to people with disabilities.

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