Matt Bevin

Office of KY Secretary of State

County clerks across Kentucky will be double checking vote totals tomorrow\today in a statewide recanvass requested by two Republicans.  

Gubernatorial candidate James Comer is seeking a recanvass after losing to Matt Bevin by 83 votes in last Tuesday’s primary.  Richard Heath lost to Ryan Quarles by just over 14-hundred votes in the race for the GOP nomination for Agriculture Commissioner.  While Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes plans to announce the outcomes of the recanvass tomorrow\today, she says the winners will still be unofficial until next month.

Jacob Ryan/WFPL

  Republican candidates for governor are scheduled to attend a “unity rally” Saturday in Lexington intended to show solidarity with the party, and to mend wounds caused by the contentious—and not yet settled—gubernatorial primary race.

But the rally has several potential points of tension, Kentucky political observers say.

LRC Public Information

State Agriculture Commissioner Jamie Comer is asking for a recanvass after he lost last night's primary to Louisville businessman Matt Bevin by only 83 votes. 

Al Cross, Director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues doesn't anticipate a re-canvass will change the outcome of the state GOP contest. Cross says there's little doubt about the vote count, because it's almost entirely electronic.

Wikimedia Commons

A new non-profit report examining the state of preschool in the US found that funding and enrollment have increased nationwide, but in Kentucky it’s a different story.

Twitter / Matt Bevin/James Comer/Hal Heiner

A new statewide survey shows the Kentucky Republican primary for governor is a tossup between the top three candidates.

The Survey USA poll found Matt Bevin with 27 percent support, James Comer with 26 percent, and Hal Heiner with 25 percent. Will T. Scott trailed with just 8 percent support.

Ryland Barton |

Matt Bevin has done laps around Kentucky in a messy black suburban, searching for his big political break.

Hal Heiner / Facebook

Louisville businessman Matt Bevin and Agriculture Commissioner James Comer tag-teamed attacks against former Louisville Metro Councilman Hal Heiner on Wednesday during a debate of Republican gubernatorial candidates.

Less than a month shy of the primary election, three of Kentucky’s four Republican gubernatorial candidates debated Tuesday night in Bowling Green. 

The event at WKU featured Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, and former Louisville Metro Councilman Hal Heiner. 

If elected, all three pledged to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange known as Kynect. 

Comer said the state took on a lot of responsibility that it can’t afford.

"Eighty-two percent of the people who got on Kynect ended up on Medicaid," Comer explained.  "What Kynect became for Governor Beshear was a way to greatly expand Medicaid to the point to where we have 25 percent of the state on Medicaid, one out of four people.  That's not sustainable."

As governor, Comer said he would get more Kentuckians into private health coverage while changing eligibility requirements for Medicaid. 

Matt Bevin said he would transition those who signed up on Kentucky’s exchange to the federal exchange.

"Frankly, it's a level of redundancy we can't afford.  It's as simple as that," Bevin suggested.  "We were lured into participation through the use of federal dollars."

Starting in 2017, the state must begin bearing a share of the cost of expanding Medicaid.  Currently, the federal government is picking up the entire tab.

Hal Heiner suggested tying the Medicaid expansion to workforce training so people could get a job, get off of Medicaid, and obtain private insurance.  He criticized the Medicaid expansion for lacking any level of personal responsibility.

"It doesn't have what you're seeing conservative governors in other states adopt in their plans which build in incentives to use preventive care, to use primary care providers rather than emergency care, and to make healthy lifestyle choices to reduce the overall cost," Heiner stated. 

The candidates were mostly in agreement on range of economic topics from making Kentucky a right-to-work state to protecting the coal industry. 

The other GOP gubernatorial candidate, Will T. Scott did not attend the debate, citing a scheduling conflict.

Moritz Wickendorf, Wikimedia Commons

Three Republicans and one Democrat have raised more than $1 million in this year’s race for governor in advance of the May 19 primary election.