mary lou marzian

Jonathunder, Wikimedia Commons

A state judge has ruled three Democratic state lawmakers can join a lawsuit seeking to stop Gov. Matt Bevin from cutting spending on state colleges and universities.

LRC Public Information

A trio of Democratic lawmakers are trying to join Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin over his recent order to cut state university budgets 4.5 percent for the remainder of this fiscal year. Beshear has challenged Bevin's order, saying it is an illegal overreach.

Sergey Kuzmin, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky’s new health secretary says her state agency will meet proposed budget reductions through a variety of cost-cutting measures like not filling vacant positions and cutting back on travel. 

Murat USTA, 123rf Stock Photo

Men who want prescriptions for erectile dysfunction medicine will have to clear some hurdles under a bill filed in the General Assembly. Louisville Democratic Representative Mary Lou Marzian says her bill is in reaction to the handful of anti-abortion measures that the legislature is currently considering. 

FRANKFORT—Arguing that some Kentucky legislators routinely file bills that would be, if enacted, harmful to women, activists rallied Saturday outside the state Capitol to support what they called "reproductive justice" in advance of the 2014 General Assembly session.

Roughly 75 activists caravanned from Louisville to Frankfort to advocate for legislation that would expand access to abortion and contraceptives, family support programs and comprehensive, science-based sex education.

Rae Hodge (KPR)

Seeking the passage of three pieces of legislation protecting against discrimination based on sexual orientation, more than 200 people rallied on Wednesday in the Capitol Rotunda with Kentucky's Fairness Campaign. 

Rep. Mary Lou Marzian, a Democrat of Louisville, is  sponsoring a bill that would prevent employers from discriminating against employees based on sexual orientation. The bill, along with Senate Bill 28, would also make it illegal for landlords and real estate agents to discriminate on those grounds.

The House Judiciary Committee has passed a bill that will require police to take DNA samples when they arrest people on felony charges. If the measure is approved by the full Legislature, Kentucky would join 25 other states that take DNA samples from felony arrestees.

The vote was unanimous and will proceed to the full House for consideration.

Hoping to reduce gun violence in Kentucky, a group of Democratic lawmakers have filed a bill that would allow Kentucky State Police to set regulations banning certain firearms or high-capacity magazines.

The bill, which state Sen. Kathy Stein plans to file in the Senate on Thursday, would also allow cities and colleges to ban guns and would require private background checks for every gun sale in Kentucky.

A bill that would require a certain percentage of the state’s energy to come from renewable sources is scheduled for a hearing in the Kentucky House of Representatives tomorrow. The bill has little chance of passage this late in the session, but its advocates are hoping to set the stage for next year.

A bill that would allow random drug testing of welfare recipients was the subject of legislative boycotts and hearings today.

House Bill 26 is sponsored by Republican representative Lonnie Napier, who says the bill does not unfairly target anyone and would help rid drug abuse from those who benefit from government programs.

The bill was never expected to come for a vote in committee, leading Napier’s fellow Republicans on the panel to boycott the meeting.