Martin Luther King Jr.

This year the Martin Luther King Jr. national holiday, a celebration of American racial harmony, comes in the context of a turning in American race relations.  

On 17 June 2015 white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine worshipers at Charleston’s historic Emanuel AME Church. He hoped to provoke a race war. Instead his actions—coming in the context of numerous police shootings of innocent African Americans documented by the Black Lives Matter Movement—provoked governmental as well as popular responses.  

Stu Johnson, WEKU

This April will mark half a century since the death of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.  In keeping with a decades old observance, hundreds Monday morning marched through the center of downtown Lexington to honor King’s legacy.

Michael Cochran

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is coming up and with it the showing of a fictional reimagining of the Civil Rights leader.


  A panel discussion  in Paducah recently focused on issues of "Race in America." The forum is part of West Kentucky Community and Technical College's Diversity and Inclusion Series. Topics included the display of the Confederate Flag, which some view as a symbol of slavery and resistance to racial equality.

Murray State University

Murray State University welcomes Martin Luther King III for the 2016 Presidential Lecture Series tonight. 

The event is tonight (February 8) at 8 p.m. in Lovett Auditorium on Murray State's campus. It is free to the public.

Nataliya Gvozdeva, 123RF.COM

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is January 18 and we're celebrating his life and legacy with two specials, preempting Sounds Good.

At 11 a.m. hear Global Village Dr. King Day, with songs dedicated to him and his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement. At Noon, hear Humankind Special, The Power of Nonviolence: The Spirituality of Peacemaking, an insightful and uplifting look at breaking the cycle of violence at home and abroad.

UT Martin logo,

The University of Tennessee at Martin hosts its 15th Annual Civil Rights Conference next week. Conference Director, Assistant Professor of History Renee LaFleur previews the multi-day event whose keynote speaker is presidential historian and Director of the Lyndon B. Johnson Library since 2009, Mark Updegrove. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with LaFleur about the theme of how President Johnson's "Great Society" contributed to the Civil Rights Movement and other featured speakers at the event. / Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

This week marks the 50th anniversary of a Kentucky event of importance not only for the state, but also for the nation. On March 5, 1964, over 10,000 people marched to Frankfort, Kentucky, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Jackie Robinson, demanding a law to end segregation in the Commonwealth. We hear the story with Kate Lochte, through the voices of a state employee of that time and an organizer of the event - who is still working for human rights.

The Murray City Council is debating reducing the council's size, meeting load and number of committees.

City administrator Matt Mattingly prompted a lengthy discussion among council members at Thursday night's meeting after putting forth a proposal to reduce standing committees -  and cut city council meetings to one per month – in order to make the city more efficient.

Hopkins County reaches a milestone Saturday with a program celebrating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. legacy that is one of the longest-running and largest MLK national holiday recognition services in Kentucky. Saturday's event theme is "Yesterday's Dream, Tomorrow's Reality," with the program starting at 4 p.m. in the Madisonville Community College Health Campus Byrnes Auditorium, at 750 Laffoon Street in Madisonville. Kate Lochte speaks with Tim W. Thomas of Madisonville, who serves as a Commissioner with the Kentucky Human Rights Commission.