LG & E

Hannu Viitanen, 123rf Stock Photo

Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities are planning a new way to offer solar energy to residential customers. 

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has scheduled meetings in Louisville and Lexington for the public to weigh in on plans by utilities Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities to shut down their coal ash ponds at several power plants. 


Governor Matt Bevin appointed Greg Thomas as Deputy Secretary of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Tuesday. Thomas previously worked in the private sector for LG&E and KU Energy LLC for more than 25 years. 

elycefeliz / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

The Kentucky Public Service Commission is holding a public meeting to discuss Kentucky Utilities Company's proposed 9.6 percent rate increase that would raise a customer’s average monthly bill by $11 dollars.

Plans have been scrapped for a proposed natural gas power plant in western Kentucky. 

Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas and Electric announced plans last year to construct a $700 million facility in Muhlenberg County. 

The utilities announced this week the project was canceled because nine municipalities have chosen to terminate their contracts with the utility companies. 

State Representative Brent Yonts of Greenville is disappointed by the loss of construction jobs.

"It would have brought people into the county to live, to work, and maybe even settle here at some point in time," said Yonts. "It will have a substantial negative impact on the county because we will not be getting the benefit of that work."

A new natural gas plant would have made up for the loss of an old coal-fired power plant in Muhlenberg County that’s slated to close next spring. 

KU and LG&E still plan to build a solar-generating plant, but Yonts believes it would have less economic impact.

Update 1:25 p.m.: Comments from Division of Water and Louisville Gas & Electric.

After collecting a year's worth of images of what they say are illegal discharges from one of Louisville Gas & Electric's coal ash ponds into the Ohio River, environmental groups say they plan to sue the company.


A partnership between LG&E and KU and a Kentucky company could help both the energy and agriculture sectors, Kentucky leaders announced Monday.

Kentucky company Charah  is opening up a facility in Louisville that will takeleftover gypsum from the Mill Creek Power Station and turn it into a sulfur product—such as fertilizers—for Kentucky farmers.


State leaders say a nearly $1 billion project to update pollution controls at a massive Louisville power plant will be a boost for Kentucky's coal industry.

The upgrades at LG&E's Mill Creek Generating Station in southwestern Jefferson County are expected to add about 700 construction jobs. They will also allow the 1,400-megawatt plant to continue to burn coal by meeting stricter federal air regulations that go in force in 2016.

Wikimedia Commons

An energy-saving program that’s been around since 2001 is starting to see a steady uptick in the number of participants.