letters

Society
11:42 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Watson & Robinson Collection Offers Glimpse into African-American History in Hopkinsville

Kate Lochte speaks with Louise Jones of the Kentucky Historical Society about the Watson & Robinson Families Collection on exhibit at the Hopkinsville-Christian County Public Library. The collection features 27 handwritten letters detailing family history information and offers a glimpse into the history of African-American communities in Hopkinsville. A free community event, made possible by the Kentucky Historical Society and the African American Genealogy Group of Kentucky, will be held July 20 at the library. Sessions include open-sharing sessions about the letters, and a special panel discussion on researching African-American roots. For more information, contact the KHS Reference Desk at 502-564-1792, extension 4460, or email KHSrefdesk@ky.gov.

Crime
4:37 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Lexington Police Release Letters from Former Governor Nunn to Son

Steve Nunn

Lexington Police have released documents chronicling a murder investigation that ended in a guilty plea from the son of former Governor Louie B. Nunn.  The 191 pages includes a 1997 letter from the former governor to his son Steve Nunn saying quote "within my mind and memory, you do not exist.”  Nunn pleaded guilty in June to the September 2009, shooting death of 29-year-old Amanda Ross. He had been engaged to Ross. Nunn is serving life in prison without parole. The documents include interviews with family and friends describing the couple's volatile relationship.

Government & Politics
7:16 am
Mon February 13, 2012

Amish Man's Letters Sway Lawmakers on Buggy Issue

In a high tech world of iPads and smart phones, an old-fashioned Amish man showed that pen and paper remain effective communication devices.   Jacob Gingerich wrote 138 simple, heart-felt letters to lawmakers in Frankfort. The letters are being credited for the Senate's quick passage of a bill that would allow Kentucky's Amish residents to use reflective tape on their horse-drawn buggies instead of bright orange triangular signs that some object to on religious grounds.  The Mayfield resident used no computer, no letterhead, no printer and no copier.

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