Kentucky tax reform

Kentucky: Ranked #1 for Wrong Health Reasons

Jul 20, 2017
nito500, 123rf Stock Photo

What I am referring to, sadly, are the horrible chronic diseases and premature deaths caused by Kentuckians using tobacco products.

Per Capita, Kentucky ranks #1 in cigarette consumption of all 50 states and leads the nation in lung cancer deaths.  One-third of all cancer deaths in Kentucky are related to tobacco.  The No. 1 killer of women is heart attack and stroke and of men, cancer; most are attributable to tobacco. Kentucky leads the nation by far in pregnant women who smoke (26.5% vs 10.7%). 

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

  Jim Carroll started working for Kentucky’s state parks system in 1978 making $780 a month.

“So I knew the pay wasn’t good but I knew that it was a place where you could advance over time,” Carroll said. “It was stable, and retirement was part of that.”

Carroll later worked in the tourism cabinet and retired in 2009. Since then, he’s organized a group of concerned state pensioners called Kentucky Government Retirees.

lrc.state.ky.us

Discussions about Kentucky tax reform have circulated around the state capitol for decades but no comprehensive tax measure has passed.

Two state lawmakers say major pension shortfalls could help move the issue along. 

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Lt. Gov Jerry Abramson presented a draft of Governor Steve Beshear's proposed tax code changes to the House budget committee today, which was first announced by Beshear last week. The changes, if fully implemented, could raise an estimated $210 million annually by expanding the 6% sales tax to select services, an increased tax on cigarettes from 60 cents to $1 dollar per pack, and reducing tax breaks on pensions for people earning more than $80,000. On Sounds Good, Kate speaks with policy analyst and member of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Committee on tax reform, Jason Bailey about the events of the day.

Beshear Unveils Tax Plan

Feb 5, 2014

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has released his plans for tax reform. The plan would raise an additional 210 million dollars in revenue each year.

Beshear says the plan would make Kentucky’s economy more competitive with neighboring states by taxing services, lowering income taxes, and reducing the top corporate income tax by a tenth of a percent.

Beshear Tight-Lipped on Tax Reform Specifics

Feb 3, 2014

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear isn’t spilling any secrets about the tax reform proposal he plans to unveil Tuesday.

Beshear won't say whether he wants to raise taxes, or whether his plan will be revenue neutral. And with the session of the General Assembly a third of the way over, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are skeptical there’s enough time to get tax reform passed. But Beshear doesn’t seem to think so.

wikipedia.org

Leaders from both the Kentucky House and Senate are scheduled to meet with Gov. Steve Beshear Monday to talk tax reform. 

Lawmakers have been waiting on details of a proposal. Beshear promised weeks ago he would come forward with a legislative proposal to reform taxes.  But, the particulars of how to change the state’s tax structure will likely be revealed in Monday's meeting. 

What to Expect from the 2014 Kentucky General Assembly

Jan 7, 2014

As temperatures in Kentucky slowly climb out of the polar abyss, so too will state lawmakers emerge from their districts and trek to Frankfort for the opening day of the 2014 regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly.

The session starts Tuesday.

LRC Public Information

In just over a month, lawmakers are back in Frankfort for a special session on new boundaries for Kentucky’s legislative districts.  But, there are no plans yet to resolve another issue facing the state.

It’s often called real tax reform or comprehensive tax reform. And it’s been on Frankfort’s radar screen for years. Despite numerous proposals, no substantial change in tax policy has come under serious consideration at the statehouse. Gov. Beshear says Kentucky needs a ‘modern tax system’ responsive to a 21st century economy.  But, he admits, politicians would rather avoid the topic.

Gov. Steve Beshear says he's still considering whether to call a special legislative session for later this year.

A few issues remain unresolved from the last regular session, mainly redistricting and further tax reform. And Beshear has been pushing for tax reform to pay for the state's education system.

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