kentucky republican party

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

The head of the Jefferson County Republican Party is defending Donald Trump’s claim that the media is “rigging” the election against the GOP nominee.

A person who’s spent decades keeping his finger on the pulse of Kentucky politics doesn’t anticipate weekend revelations about Donald Trump to greatly erode his support in the Commonwealth.  The effect on GOP efforts to take over the Kentucky House appear a little more uncertain.


Tuesday is the deadline in Kentucky to register to vote in the November 8 general election.

Republican Party of Kentucky/Facebook

The Republican Party of Kentucky has asked a state House candidate to drop out of the race after he posted several photos on Facebook depicting President Barack Obama and the first lady as monkeys. 

Dan Johnson / Facebook

A pastor running for state representative in Bullitt County has taken down offensive Facebook posts after reproach from both political parties in the state. In an interview with WDRB, he refused to apologize for depicting President Obama as a monkey.

Ryland Barton, WFPL, cropped

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asked Kentucky Republicans to pray for his party to maintain control amid what he calls a "challenging" election cycle. 

Jenni Todd, WKMS

Conservative columnist and RunSwitch co-founder Scott Jennings emcees tomorrow's Fancy Farm political picnic. He and Les Fugate, also with the public relations firm RunSwitch, speak with Matt Markgraf about the event, bringing together politicians and people from across the political divide for a day of rowdy, old-time stump speaking. Jennings has spent the last couple months preparing for the big day.

Becca Schimmel, WKMS

The head of the Kentucky Republican Party is calling Saturday’s presidential caucus a “real success.” But turnout was only slightly higher at the caucus compared to the last GOP presidential primary.


Kentucky Republicans are holding a presidential caucus on Saturday, and its success will be determined in large part by voter turnout. Some party faithful don’t think enough has been done to publicize the caucus. 

Republican logo, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky Republicans are hoping for a big turnout for the party’s inaugural presidential caucus on Saturday, even though the event isn’t generating as much excitement locally with the absence of Sen. Rand Paul in the race for the White House.