Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo

Right To Work Legislation Introduced in Kentucky

Mar 3, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky House’s top-ranking Republican has introduced a right-to-work bill in his chamber.

Under the measure, workers would not be required to pay union dues as a condition of employment. House GOP Floor Leader Jeff Hoover says such a law would create jobs.

Kentucky LRC

The 2014 Kentucky General Assembly began Tuesday, but discussion was dominated by fallout from a committee tasked with investigating sexual harassment claims against a former lawmaker.

Members of the panel took turns speaking on the House floor, with Republican members saying that the committee had failed by not fully investigating the claims against Rep. John Arnold.  The panel disbanded after Arnold resigned.

LRC Public Information

Kentucky’s budget priorities for 2015 could require nearly $1 billion in revenue that the state doesn’t have. House Speaker Greg Stumbo told a group of business leaders earlier this month that the cost of funding priority issues like education, public employee raises and more could total an estimated $800 million.

 "It would probably be more of a number like seven to eight-hundred million, some would argue larger than that," says Stumbo. "It just depends upon how big a bite of the apple you want to take, but I don't think we can do that."

Stumbo says that it’s unlikely the state will have that money until Kentucky fully recovers from the 2008 recession. But, it’s coming. 

LRC Public Information

A leading Kentucky politician is weighing the idea of legalizing medical marijuana in the state. 

House Speaker Greg Stumbo said today he's leaning toward supporting the use of medicinal marijuana and that the topic is worth debating. Legislation to legalize medical marijuana has been introduced in the General Assembly in the past but has never received the support needed to pass.

Stumbo raised the issue after Attorney General Jack Conway sent an advisory letter to Governor Steve Beshear, Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and other state leaders to clarify current law related to marijuana’s cousin, hemp. 

LRC Public Information

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo has given the Kentucky State Police memos regarding documents shredded by the former head of the Legislative Research Commission.

Stumbo provided the documents to legislative security specialist Rick Devers along with a request for state police to take whatever action is deemed appropriate. House Republican Floor Leader Jeff Hoover asked for an investigation after former LRC Director Bobby Sherman returned to his office with other staffers on Sunday, two days after he resigned, and shredded documents. 

One of the staffers, Deputy Director Robert Jenkins, said the documents that were destroyed were either duplicates or were of a personal nature, including junk mail, mortgage papers and salary comparisons for LRC.

Wikimedia Commons

State employees with higher pensions should pay more to help the underfunded systems recover, Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo said in a recent interview.

One thing Stumbo doesn't want to see is lawmakers floating bonds to help pay for the state’s underfunded pensions.

A 10th District House seat candidate says he made a mistake asking the Earlington city clerk to send an email regarding his campaign rally. Earlington mayor Mike Seiber tells The Madisonville Messenger he inadvertently asked her to send the message, which was about his upcoming political rally featuring House Speaker Greg Stumbo. Sieber says he realized his mistake the next day when he received a forwarded copy of the original email carrying the clerk’s email address. Seiber is a Democrat who is challenging Republican incumbent Ben Waide.

LRC Public Information

Kentucky Republicans are ramping up their campaign to take control of the state house in this year's elections.

The GOP has latched on to House Speaker Greg Stumbo's declaration that he will vote for President Barack Obama this fall.

Kentucky lawmakers and Governor Steve Beshear are applauding the passage of a bill aimed at reducing prescription pill abuse.

Beshear signed the Pill Mill Bill today, inviting key legislators and law enforcement officers to take part in the ceremony.

The new law isn’t as tough as some had hoped. But House Speaker Greg Stumbo says changes can always be made later.

“And I would have obviously preferred something stronger, but it is a step in the right direction and if it doesn’t work we can always come back and do something to amend it later,” Stumbo says.