Kentucky Democratic Party

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Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear says the national Democratic Party is paying the price for not putting enough resources into winning Congressional and state legislative races.

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Jennifer Moore is Board Chair of Emerge Kentucky, an organization that trains Democratic women to run for political office. Moore is a founding Partner of Grossman & Moore PLLC Injury Lawyers in Louisville. She travels to west Kentucky today to be a part of the KET broadcast of the Fancy Farm Picnic tomorrow and speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about how Emerge Kentucky trains women and her forecast for Fancy Farm.

There are those of us, of sufficient vintage, who can recall people saying, “If you want to vote in Kentucky, you register as a Democrat.”  That always seemed to be a little bit more true here in western Kentucky, the birthplace of Alben Barkley, Wendell Ford, Ned Breathitt, Ruby Laffoon, and Julian Carroll. Of course, western Kentucky is more competitive today politically, but one has to wonder how our part of the Commonwealth became a Democratic bastion in the first place. Dr. George Humphreys is the director of Madisonville Community College’s Muhlenberg campus and an alumnus of Murray State’s History Department.  He’s the author of The Democratic Rock of Gibraltar: The Rise and Fall of Western Kentucky Democratic Politics Since the New Deal, slated to come out next spring.  He’s on the line today to speak with us about it.

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Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes is the presumptive favorite to win next May’s Democratic primary for U.S. Senate, but like Republican Senator Mitch McConnell, it seems she will face more than a token primary challenge.

The Kentucky State Democratic Executive Committee has reported that it raised nearly $58,000 in March.  That's according to paperwork filed with the Federal Election Commission last week. 

The organization has been filing monthly reports with the FEC, disclosing its fundraising and spending. The latest report, which covers a period from March 1 through March 31, shows disbursements of nearly $62,000. It also shows the organization has just less than $42,000 remaining in the bank. 

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Kentucky Democrats are bringing in a well-connected out-of-state politician to headline their annual state dinner. 

State Democrats aim for high-profile names to headline their annual Wendell Ford Dinner—this year they've booked Beau Biden, the Delaware Attorney General and the son of Vice President Joe Biden.

The Kentucky Democratic Party  was looking for a young, up-and-coming speaker for this year's event, Chair Dan Logsdon said.

Logsdon said the party reached out with the help of Kentucky's own attorney general, Jack Conway.

The campaign for control of the state House has taken a nasty turn, with radio and TV ads being pulled because of inaccuracies. Republicans have successfully knocked radio ads attacking their candidates off the air in the Bardstown and Mayfield areas. And they are working on getting TV ads in Lexington pulled down as well. The areas where the ads were pulled are considered hot spots for state legislative races, where either the GOP or Democrats are hoping to win seats.

Democratic National Committee

Unlike their GOP counterparts, zero Kentucky officials will take the main stage to speak at this week’s Democratic National Convention.  Last week, Republicans heard from three Kentuckians at their convention: Senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul and congressional candidate Andy Barr.  University of Louisville political science professor Dewey Clayton says Republicans extended their arms to Kentucky speakers, most notably Paul, to bolster up Mitt Romney’s support with the tea party crowd.  Clayton says Democrats don’t need Kentucky officials to speak because they know President Barack Oba

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The push to add support for gay marriage to the national Democratic platform this year is unlikely to affect elected officials in Kentucky.

Following President Barack Obama's recent statement in support of same-sex marriage, political observers expect the party to change the platform at this year's Democratic convention.

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With no statewide races on the ballot this year, the Kentucky Democratic Party is focusing its efforts on the General Assembly.

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