Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

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  The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights’ governing board wants to see a change to a section of the state constitution that allows slavery as criminal punishment.

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The public is being invited to comment about moving the statue of Jefferson Davis from the State Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort to a nearby history center. The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is encouraging the public to attend a meeting of the Kentucky Historic Properties Advisory Commission on August 5, and to comment on the removal by July 29th. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Commissioner Timothy Thomas of Madisonville.

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The NAACP writes on their Facebook page: "After tireless work and Congressional hearings that led to the Church Arson Prevention Act being passed in 1996 - almost 20 years later, we must again seek justice, investigate and find #WhoIsBurningBlackChurches. Six black churches have burned since the terrorist attack at Emanuel AME Church." Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights John Johnson was the youngest president of any NAACP chapter at the age of 18 and spent 20 years working at the national headquarters before his current position. He spoke with Kate Lochte last week before the funeral for victims of the Charleston shooting, about it being long past time for racism to exist and how he thinks law enforcement can improve practices in black communities.

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The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights’ director says protecting against sexual orientation discrimination is the next step in the civil rights campaign.  John J. Johnson says the commission has been focused in recent years on extending fairness ordinances in local communities throughout the commonwealth.

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

The Kentucky Martin Luther King Jr. Commission has named a Madisonville man the recipient of this year’s Martin Luther King Citizenship Award.

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The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is in Bowling Green this week to announce the latest inductees into the state’s Civil Rights Hall of Fame.

50th Anniversary Civil Rights March on Frankfort

Jan 20, 2014
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As a young man, shortly out of high school, John J. Johnson was the president of the local NAACP in his hometown of Franklin, Kentucky, and was a member of the executive committee for the March on Frankfort 50 years ago, which is being commemorated this year. That first march touched the nation and ultimately helped lead to the passage of the U.S. Civil Rights Act on July 2 of the same year. Today, John J. Johnson is the Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, and speaks with Kate Lochte.

A Paducah neurologist’s office has settled a discrimination suit with a hearing-impaired patient who alleges he was not provided a sign language interpreter during a May 2011 visit. 

Mike J. Young claims Comprehensive Neurological Services refused to provide the interpreter.  If so, this would violate the state and U.S. Civil Rights acts.  Comprehensive Neurological Services denied any violation, but the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights determined there is enough evidence that discrimination may have occurred. 

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Kentucky Human Rights Commission Director John Johnson speaks with Kate Lochte next. The focus of their conversation is a set of 7 social justice and civil rights resolutions honoring the memory of Martin Luther King Jr., adopted this month. With the 11-member board of commissioners, the executive director and 36 staff members, the Commission receives, initiates, investigates, conciliates and rules upon jurisdictional complaints alleging violations of the Kentucky Civil Rights Act. These resolutions are calls for action to government officials and the public.

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The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is calling on the state to end the use of the death penalty, saying it is often applied unfairly against minorities and the poor. The commissioners, who enforce state and federal civil rights laws, urged Kentucky lawmakers in a resolution last week to repeal the law that allows the use of the death penalty in some murder cases. The commission’s resolution will be submitted to Governor Steve Beshear and to each state legislator. As of April 1, Kentucky had 35 inmates on death row. Kentucky last executed an inmate in 2008.

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