ken ham

Gage Skidmore / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Bill Nye is touring the new Noah's Ark attraction in Kentucky that he has called a danger to the nation's science education.  

Answers in Genesis president Ken Ham extended an invitation to Nye, best known for his 1990s science TV show, to take a private tour of the Ark Encounter Friday.

Rick Howlett, WFPL

After years of planning, fundraising and a legal battle with the state, the Ark Encounter theme park opens to the public Thursday near Williamstown, in Northern Kentucky.

arkencounter.com

A Noah's Ark attraction built by Christians who say the biblical story really happened is ready to open in Kentucky.

The long-awaited theme park based on the story of a man who got a warning from God about a worldwide flood will debut in central Kentucky this week. 

Ark Encounter / Facebook

A battle over a Kentucky tax incentive for a religious theme park featuring Noah's Ark has ended in a win for the big boat.

A state tourism board this week approved a sales tax rebate incentive worth about $18 million for the 510-foot-long Ark Encounter attraction, tourism spokesman Garry Gupton said.

Days after a wide-ranging debate on creationism and evolution between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, the event is driving an online conversation. Themes of belief and literalism, logic and faith — and, for some, relevance — are being aired and disputed. And some wonder what the debate accomplished.

The video of the more than two-hour debate, in which Nye and Ham presented their views on how the Earth and its surroundings were created, has been viewed more than 830,000 times on YouTube. At one point, the live event drew more than 500,000 viewers.

A crowd of hundreds braved snowy and icy weather to attend a much-publicized debate in Northern Kentucky last night.

Bill Nye the Science Guy and Ken Ham, the founder and CEO of the Creation Museum faced off over the topic, “Is Creationism a viable model of origins in today’s modern scientific era.”

The highly publicized debate scheduled for Tuesday in Northern Kentucky between Creation Museum president Ken Ham and  science educator/television personality Bill Nye has sparked critics from both sides.  

Some scientists argue that Nye should not engage the topic of creationism; others say Ham needs the the press to raise money for the development of a Bible-themed amusement park.

Science educator and television host Bill Nye will head to northern Kentucky Tuesday for his much-publicized debate with Creation Museum president Ken Ham. But the star of  “Bill Nye the Science Guy” first stopped at Murray State University Monday night to deliver this year’s Presidential Lecture.