U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Thomas Perez says his agency will use its "bully pulpit" to strike at what he calls "a disturbing trend" that leaves workers without medical care and wage replacement payments when they are injured on the job.

In an interview with NPR, Perez also confirms a Labor Department investigation of an opt-out alternative to state-regulated workers' compensation that has saved employers millions of dollars but that he says is "undermining that basic bargain" for American workers.

Marshall County Fiscal Court

Economic development officials in Marshall County are awaiting word on whether or not a project that could bring nearly 50 jobs to the county will be approved for state financial incentives.

Automation may replace millions of jobs in Tennessee

Mar 21, 2016

A report released by the state of Tennessee suggests that up to 1.4 million people are at risk of losing their jobs to automation.

rido, 123rf Stock Photo

The health care industry in Kentucky continued to add jobs in 2015, according to newly revised data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The U.S. economy gained 242,000 jobs in February while average wages dropped slightly, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics report released Friday.

The unemployment rate held steady at 4.9 percent.

The report indicates stronger job growth than expected, and an improvement over the previous month. January's count of 151,000 new jobs — far lower than had been anticipated — was revised upward, to 172,000. And the job gains for December were also revised upward, from 262,000 to 271,000.


Kentucky’s rate of unemployment rose slightly to 5.8 percent in January this year.  

According to the state Office of Employment and Training, the preliminary January jobless rate was half a percentage point above the 5.3 percent rate recorded in January 2015.  

The U.S. economy added 292,000 jobs in December while unemployment held steady at 5 percent, according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The number of new jobs was higher than many economists had anticipated; NPR's John Ydstie says experts had expected about 200,000 new jobs.

Chris Potter - / Flickr (Creative Commons License) (CC BY 2.0)

A new report is offering a snapshot of how Kentucky’s economy has fared since the end of the national recession. 

In a report prepared for the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, University of Louisville Economics Professor Paul Coomes says the Bluegrass State now has 20,000 jobs above it's pre-recession peak. 

No question, this was a traumatic, sad week because of the mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif. It's not easy to turn to good news.

But putting grief aside for a moment, there were indeed positive developments for the country in recent days. With cheaper energy, more jobs and higher stock prices, most Americans have been seeing their financial situations improve. Here are some of this week's highlights:

The U.S. economy added 211,000 jobs in November, the Labor Department says in its new report. The unemployment rate remained steady at 5 percent, according to the monthly data from the agency's Bureau of Labor Statistics – the last such report before the Fed meets later this month.