Jobs

Say you are one of the roughly 15,000 American steel workers who have been laid off — or received notice of coming layoffs — in the past year.

You and your boss would cheer any reduction in China's massive steelmaking capacity. Chinese steel has been flooding global markets and hurting profits for U.S. companies.

The Labor Department's May jobs report, released Friday, was surprisingly bad.

Economists scrambled to explain why they hadn't seen a hiring dropoff coming. Most had predicted about 160,000 new jobs for May, but in fact, only 38,000 materialized. That was the smallest increase since September, 2010.

The U.S. economy added just 38,000 jobs in May, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics in its monthly report — far fewer than the 160,000 that economists had anticipated.

NPR business editor Marilyn Geewax called the number "shockingly low."

The unemployment rate declined by 0.3 percentage points, the Bureau says, to 4.7 percent — but that can be attributed to people dropping out of the workforce, Marilyn says.

Bevin-Hampton Administration, screenshot via YouTube

A new jobs-training program is aimed at helping young Kentucky adults with the transition out of foster care. Governor Matt Bevin unveiled the Fostering Success program this week.

Champion Homes, via Facebook

A modular and mobile home manufacturing company bringing 150 jobs to Marshall County is holding a job fair next week, as it looks to hire its first 50 employees.

kylmi.ky.gov, from pdf, cropped

A new jobs report shows unemployment rates fell in 83 Kentucky counties, rose in 33 and remained the same in 4 between April 2015 and April 2016. 

123rf Stock Photo

Trigg County is one of three more Kentucky communities certified as work ready. 

Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet Secretary Hal Heiner said in a statement the county is now on the official list of Kentucky Work Ready Communities. 

Millions more American workers will soon be eligible for overtime pay under a rule being finalized Wednesday by the Labor Department.

The rule says anyone who makes less than $47,476 per year must receive time-and-a-half pay for hours worked beyond 40 hours a week. That's roughly double the current threshold of $23,660.

The measure is one of the most sweeping moves the Obama administration has made so far in its efforts to boost slow-growing incomes. But it's sure to face opposition from some business owners.

Studies have been showing for years that this country's middle class is shrinking.

Now, the nonpartisan Pew Research Center has added another dimension to the story: Its examination of government data shows the problem is not confined to the Rust Belt or Appalachia.

In fact, the middle is shrinking from coast to coast.

Lafarge

Cement manufacturer Lafarge has announced they are no longer expanding operations at their plant in Massac County, Illinois.

The plan had been to add a third kiln at the Joppa Cement Plant which would have created around 50 new jobs.

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