jefferson davis statue

Ryland Barton, Kentucky Public Radio

A panel has unanimously voted to remove a plaque from a statue of Jefferson Davis at the Kentucky State Capitol Rotunda that labels the president of the Confederacy as “patriot, hero, statesman.”

Ryland Barton via 89.3 WFPL News Louisville

Kentucky’s NAACP chapter is renewing efforts to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis from the state capitol rotunda after a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

State officials have appointed a committee to provide historical context for a statue of Jefferson Davis in the Kentucky Capitol. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

A little over two weeks ago, we spoke with two professors of Murray State's history department who were among the 72 Kentucky history professors who signed a letter calling for the removal of the statue of Confederate president and Kentucky native Jefferson Davis from the capitol rotunda in Frankfort. The letter went to Governor Steve Beshear and to the Kentucky Historical Properties Advisory Commission, which earlier this August voted 7-2 to keep the statue where it is. But that doesn't mean the debate is over. On Sounds Good, Todd Hatton speaks with Dr. Tom Hiter, former Director of Heritage Defense for the Sons of Confederate Veterans and longtime SCV member Dr. Don Duncan.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Seventy-two history professors in Kentucky have signed a letter to the Historic Properties Advisory Commission of Kentucky calling for the removal of the statue of the controversial Jefferson Davis in the capitol rotunda in Frankfort to a museum. Todd Hatton speaks with two history professors at Murray State University who signed the letter, Dr. Duane Bolin and Dr. David Pizzo who argue for a contextual understanding of Davis and explain Kentucky's distinct position as a state on both sides of the Civil War.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Most Kentucky voters support keeping the statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in the state Capitol rotunda, according to Bluegrass Poll results released Monday.

The state Historic Properties Advisory Commission on Wednesday will review recently gathered public comments on whether the Davis statue should be removed from the Capitol rotunda, which is considered a place of honor for notable Kentuckians.

Wikimedia Commons/Author: Daderot

 

The chance for the public to comment on whether the state should keep a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in the state Capitol rotunda closes on Wednesday.

Members of the Historic Properties Advisory Commission will then discuss findings at a special meeting held on Aug. 5.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

The public is being invited to comment about moving the statue of Jefferson Davis from the State Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort to a nearby history center. The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is encouraging the public to attend a meeting of the Kentucky Historic Properties Advisory Commission on August 5, and to comment on the removal by July 29th. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Commissioner Timothy Thomas of Madisonville.

The Historic Properties Advisory Commission will take public comment on whether to remove the statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis from Kentucky’s state Capitol rotunda.

Commission chairman Steve Collins said that the commission needs to look into the statue’s historic value and the logistics of moving it.

“We need to embrace our history, but we need to be very sensitive to the concerns that everyone has with respect to how we do that,” Collins said.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

  Top Kentucky Democrats and Republicans  want a statue of Jefferson Davis removed from the state Capitol rotunda in Frankfort.

The calls to remove the statue of the Confederate president and Kentucky native come amid national scrutiny of Confederate memorials and symbols, sparked by last week’s shooting death of nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charlestown, South Carolina.