infant

Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

Research on the benefits of breast-feeding continues to grow, with studies showing some positive health effects last into adulthood. Breast-feeding rates in the Ohio Valley, however, still lag behind the national average. Efforts to help mothers in the region overcome breast-feeding challenges are beginning to pay off.

Labor Gains: Midwifery Goes From Horseback to Hospitals

Jun 21, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

Nurse midwives have delivered babies in the Ohio Valley for nearly 100 years. But as Mary Meehan reports, that traditional practice is getting a new push with the opening of a clinic at the University of Kentucky.

David Benbennick, Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

A Kentucky woman has been charged with manslaughter in connection to the death of a baby. 

Courtesy Nationwide Children’s Hospital

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis is reaching a new generation as the number of drug affected babies rises at an astonishing rate. 

If you can get pregnant, you should be popping at least one pill a day: a folic acid supplement to lower the risk of a type of serious birth defect in any future offspring.

So says the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which Tuesday reiterated its 2009 recommendation that all women who can conceive take 400 to 800 micrograms daily of the B vitamin in case their diet isn't providing enough of it.

By Paul Goyette from Chicago, USA (bird's eye) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

When the 2016 legislative session begins next month, state lawmakers will consider expanding the Kentucky Safe Infants Act to include churches. 

The state law currently allows parents to drop off unwanted newborns, three days old or less, at police and fire departments, and hospital emergency rooms without being criminally charged. 

Kentucky's premature birth rate is slowly declining, but it still falls above the national average, according to a report released Thursday.

The report, called the March of Dimes Premature Birth Rate Report Card, gave Kentucky a "C" grade. 

The state's premature birth rate was 12.6 percent in 2013; in 2012 it was 12.7 percent.

The national rate in 2013 was 11.5 percent.

A 2001 law could have prevented the arrest of a Paducah teen and the death of her baby. The Safe Infants Act allows parents of newborns less than 72 hours old to drop the child off anonymously without consequences. Police departments, fire departments and hospitals are will all accept anonymous drop-offs. The law protects parents from legal repercussions as long as the child shows no signs of abuse. Parents have 30 days to change their minds before the child is put under permanent state custody.