Indiana on Friday became the second state to win federal approval to add a work requirement for adult Medicaid recipients who gained coverage under the Affordable Care Act. A less debated provision in the state's new plan could lead to tens of thousands of people losing coverage if they fail to complete paperwork documenting their eligibility for the program.

As the Trump administration moves to give states more flexibility in running Medicaid, advocates for the poor are keeping a close eye on Indiana to see whether such conservative ideas improve or harm care.

Indiana in 2015 implemented some of the most radical changes seen to the state-federal program that covers nearly 1 in 4 low-income Americans — including charging some adults a monthly premium and locking out for six months some of those who don't pay their premiums.

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Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill says he'll appeal a federal judge's ruling that blocks parts of a new state law that would make it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents' knowledge.

Jacob Ryan/WFPL

A federal judge weighing a lawsuit that seeks to block parts of a new Indiana abortion law says she will issue a ruling before the law takes effect. 

Planned Parenthood logo via Facebook

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is suing over a new Indiana law that makes it tougher for girls under age 18 to get an abortion without their parents knowledge. 

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A federal judge in Indianapolis has blocked a state mandate forcing women to undergo an ultrasound at least 18 hours before having an abortion.

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood’s Kentucky and Indiana president says she will be stepping down from the position this summer.

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Attorneys general from Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia will lead a conference of health care professionals, faith-based groups and others aimed at eliminating substance abuse in their communities.


Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and local officials have announced a training facility in eastern Kentucky to help out-of-work coal miners find jobs in advanced manufacturing.

The eKentucky Advanced Manufacturing Institute in Paintsville plans to accept its first class in February. The 16-week program trains people to operate advanced computer numeric control machines. Bevin's office said workers in the field average about $20 an hour and said there are at least 200 vacancies within commuting distance of Paintsville.

Governor Mike Pence has declared a public health emergency in one southern Indiana county. 

An HIV epidemic has been linked to intravenous drug use in Scott County. 

Deputy State Health Commissioner Jennifer Walthall says people are abusing a powerful painkiller that’s a cousin to Oxycontin and heroin.

"It's Oxymorphone, which the trade name for that is Opana," Walthall explained to WKU Public Radio.  "It's an incredibly powerful and potent opiate that comes in pill form, but can be crushed, boiled, and then injected."

The Indiana State Department of Health has confirmed 71 cases of HIV.  In comparison, Dr. Walthall says Scott County typically sees around five new HIV cases a year. 

The state is preparing to set up a temporary needle exchange program that will allow addicts to swap out dirty needles for clean ones in an effort to stop the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C.