immigration

Should The U.S. Allow Private Refugee Sponsorship?

Sep 19, 2017
iStockPhoto

  A Louisville-based advertising agency made news last week with their announcement that they will, as a company, sponsor the resettlement of a family in the area. But the term “sponsor” is a technical — and complicated — term when it comes to who can step up to invite refugees into a country.

Many conservatives pundits and lawmakers were incensed that President Donald Trump appeared to make a deal with Democrats to enshrine into law the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that shields many undocumented immigrants who were brought into the U.S. as children. To make matters worse for immigration hawks, Trump is also not requiring funding to build a wall along the Mexican border as a condition of the possible deal.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

President Trump affirmed Thursday morning that a deal was in the works with Democrats that would protect some 800,000 DREAMers who could face deportation when DACA expires next year in exchange for "massive border controls."

It wasn't clear, however, whether a border wall would be part of an emerging pact, as Trump had seemed to suggest at one point.

Early Thursday, he told reporters: "The wall will come later, we're right now renovating large sections of wall, massive sections, making it brand new."

The U.S. Supreme Court will temporarily allow the Trump administration to block many refugees from six mostly Muslim countries without direct familial ties in the United States from entering this country.

In a brief order issued Monday, Justice Anthony Kennedy delayed implementation of a ruling issued by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that would have allowed entry to refugees with formal ties to resettlement agencies here.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University President Bob Davies said he hopes for a bipartisan Congressional effort to find a long-term solution for DACA recipients working towards university degrees and contributing to society.

 


Tuesday was hard for Evelin Salgado’s students. She teaches at Cane Ridge High School in Antioch, and many of the seats in her classroom are occupied by DREAMers. They are able to drive, work and enroll in college, thanks to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that the Trump administration now plans to phase out.

It was a tough day for Salgado too — not just from consoling her students, but because she's a DACA recipient herself.

DACA Supporters Rally in Lexington

Sep 6, 2017

As in many communities across Kentucky and the nation, supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals took to the streets of Lexington last night. 

The outcry comes in the wake of the Trump administration’s announcement Tuesday to phase DACA out in six months.


Rhonda Miller, WKU Public Radio

About 60 people marched in Bowling Green on Sept. 5 in support of DACA, or “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.” 

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

tn.gov/Official Photo

Tennessee's attorney general is abandoning a planned legal challenge of a federal program offering a reprieve from deportation to thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. 

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