hurricane

This archipelago in the Gulf of Alaska is home to one of the busiest commercial fishing ports in the country. Inside the Ocean Beauty seafood plant in Kodiak, where a maze of conveyer belts carry gutted salmon past workers in hairnets and gloves, manager James Turner ticks off everything that contributes to his monthly electricity bill: canning machines, pressure cookers, freezers lights.

"We use a lot of power here," he says.

Courtesy of Kentucky National Guard

About 120 Kentucky Army National Guard soldiers have been deployed to the U.S. Virgin Islands to assist with hurricane-relief operations. 

Photos by Kara Lofton, illustration by Jesse Wright, WVPB

The hurricane season’s super-charged storms highlighted the importance of disaster planning, and it’s not just a concern for the coasts. Scientists warn that heavy rain events have become more common in the Ohio Valley. Here's how some flood-prone communities are preparing for what experts call “the new normal” of extreme weather. 

With Hurricane Maria still smashing up Puerto Rico, the economic costs of this year's hurricane season continue to grow by the minute. It will take a while for economists to tally it all up.

But this much already is clear: The recent enormous storms have taken a toll on the housing industry.

Three separate industry reports, issued over the past three days, have all shown that rough weather in the South and wildfires in the West have been creating problems for this key economic sector.

Where will it go? How strong will it be? When will it hit? Those are the answers everyone wants — not the least of which are the hurricane forecasters themselves.

To get those answers, hundreds of millions of data points — everything from wind speeds to sea temperatures — pouring in from satellites, aircraft, balloons, buoys and ground stations are fed into the world's fastest computers and programmed with a variety of models at different resolutions, some looking at the big picture, others zooming in much closer.

America seems to be a magnet for devastating hurricanes these days.

This year, Harvey came out strong with its horrific toll on parts of Texas and Louisiana. Now Irma, downgraded slightly Friday morning to a Category 4 storm from its most recent days as a Category 5, has left destruction in its wake as it plows through the Caribbean and Cuba — and is on path to hit Florida Sunday morning.

Updated at 6:30 a.m. ET Saturday

More than 211,000 people were without power along the Gulf Coast of Texas early Saturday as Hurricane Harvey slowly made its way inland.

"Harvey is expected to slow down through the day and meander over southeastern Texas through the middle of next week," the National Hurricane Center reported at 4 a.m. Central time.

The Atlantic hurricane season could see between two and four major hurricanes in 2017, according to the latest forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. There's only a 20 percent chance that this season will be less active than normal, the agency says.

NASA

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear has signed an executive order directing the state Transportation Cabinet to expedite the transportation of emergency supplies to Hurricane Sandy victims. The order directs the cabinet to waive special registration and permit requirements for vehicles carrying relief supplies such as food, water and medicine. 

NASA

Hurricane Sandy is expected to make landfall on the southern Jersey Shore tonight, but the storms won’t reach western Kentucky. Four Purchase Area Red Cross volunteers have already deployed to the East Coast to assist with relief. National Weather Service meteorologist Greg Muffert says strong winds with gusts up to 30 miles per hour are all people in the area should expect tomorrow.

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