History

Matewan; Alexandra Kanik

Thirty years ago, the release of a small-budget film had an outsized effect on the way people in Appalachian coal country thought about their past. The film “Matewan” won critical acclaim for its depiction of a bloody chapter in the fight to organize coal miners. Jeff Young of the Ohio Valley ReSource spoke with people who organized a 30th anniversary screening of “Matewan,” a film they say unearthed a story that had long been buried. 

National Library of Isreal/web.nli.org.il

Murray State University professor of history, Dr. David Pizzo, speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about political climates seen around the world today and how they compare with that of post-WWI Weimar Republic immediately preceding its fall to the National Socialist German Workers' Party.

The WKMS Book Club is back and we’re reading Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. It’s the story of the black female mathematicians who helped win the space race. You can read the book, or watch the movie, and then meet with us on Wednesday, February 1 at 5:30 p.m. here at WKMS Studios to discuss.

It’s an hour of comradery, cookies, and great conversation. All book, movie and history lovers are welcome. Find more information about the event on our Facebook page. Hope to see you there!

Acclaim Press

Dr. James Duane Bolin has written his "Home and Away" column for newspapers across Kentucky for over a decade.  They recount his travels throughout Kentucky and the United States, as well as his journeys in family, social, and academic life.

Hickman County Museum of KY, Facebook

Hickman County is gearing up for Heritage Days, September 8 - 12, with activities including historical displays around town, a community birthday cake, the ribbon cutting for a new garden at the Historical Society and an Old Hymn Sing. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Mary Potter and Liz Jewell about the event. 

The College Board has just released the latest curriculum framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and it appears to have satisfied many of the old framework's critics.

The rewrite comes after anger over its 2014 framework sent the College Board, which administers the AP exam, back to the drawing board.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Henry Wildy Harding Sr. was among the first settlers to Calloway County after Kentucky's first governor Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson negotiated the Jackson Purchase with the Chickasaw. Back then, this land was mostly untouched wilderness. Homes, barns and fences had to be built by felling trees. Harding settled on approximately 1,000 acres of what is now the northwestern part of Murray and Calloway County. Between two wives (his first died before moving to western Kentucky), he fathered 18 children, five of whom fought for the Confederate Army in the Civil War.

Later in his life, he oversaw the local school district, donating a portion of his land for one of the school houses and also founded First Baptist Church of Murray. David Reed of Gilbertsville is his great great grandson, semi-retired District Court Judge and co-author of a book The Ancestors and Descendants of Henry Wildy Harding Sr. with his cousin. They have a family reunion this weekend and Reed speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about Harding Sr.'s remarkable legacy.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Today WKMS celebrates 45 years of memories, music, news and driveway moments. It was 3:28 p.m. on May 11, 1970 when the station went on air with the National Anthem from Murray State's campus. Back then the broadcast day was eight hours long and the coverage area was limited to western Kentucky with just 13,000 watts of power. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte is joined in the studio by Murray State University Library's Wesley Bolin, who discovered some of of the articles about WKMS' first day on the air while researching another project. Also in studio is George Cumbee of Paducah, who was one of the first staff members of WKMS, and present when the station signed on the air, in 1970.

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

Murray State Pogue Library Special Collections

For anyone interested in the history of people and places in the Four Rivers Region, Murray State University's Pogue Library is a treasure trove of valuable information. Searching through their special collections of maps, here are eight depicting the region in interesting ways: land not yet surveyed, towns that no longer exist, boundaries differently arranged. 

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