History

The College Board has just released the latest curriculum framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and it appears to have satisfied many of the old framework's critics.

The rewrite comes after anger over its 2014 framework sent the College Board, which administers the AP exam, back to the drawing board.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Henry Wildy Harding Sr. was among the first settlers to Calloway County after Kentucky's first governor Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson negotiated the Jackson Purchase with the Chickasaw. Back then, this land was mostly untouched wilderness. Homes, barns and fences had to be built by felling trees. Harding settled on approximately 1,000 acres of what is now the northwestern part of Murray and Calloway County. Between two wives (his first died before moving to western Kentucky), he fathered 18 children, five of whom fought for the Confederate Army in the Civil War.

Later in his life, he oversaw the local school district, donating a portion of his land for one of the school houses and also founded First Baptist Church of Murray. David Reed of Gilbertsville is his great great grandson, semi-retired District Court Judge and co-author of a book The Ancestors and Descendants of Henry Wildy Harding Sr. with his cousin. They have a family reunion this weekend and Reed speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about Harding Sr.'s remarkable legacy.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Today WKMS celebrates 45 years of memories, music, news and driveway moments. It was 3:28 p.m. on May 11, 1970 when the station went on air with the National Anthem from Murray State's campus. Back then the broadcast day was eight hours long and the coverage area was limited to western Kentucky with just 13,000 watts of power. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte is joined in the studio by Murray State University Library's Wesley Bolin, who discovered some of of the articles about WKMS' first day on the air while researching another project. Also in studio is George Cumbee of Paducah, who was one of the first staff members of WKMS, and present when the station signed on the air, in 1970.

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

Murray State Pogue Library Special Collections

For anyone interested in the history of people and places in the Four Rivers Region, Murray State University's Pogue Library is a treasure trove of valuable information. Searching through their special collections of maps, here are eight depicting the region in interesting ways: land not yet surveyed, towns that no longer exist, boundaries differently arranged. 

Fisk University Archives, Nashville, Tennessee

The Tennessee Historical Commission will start taking grant applications for historic preservation projects for next year starting tomorrow.

Officials say the amount of funds available for grants in Tennessee is expected to be about $200,000.

The selection progress will emphasize projects such as architectural and archaeological surveys, design guidelines for historic districts and the rehabilitation of historic buildings.

On this day 50 years ago, President John F. Kennedy gave his famous "ich bin ein Berliner" speech to West Berlin, underlying support for the West 22 months after Soviet-supported East Germany erected the Berlin Wall. Commentator and Murray State History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this statement of US policy and its impact on the Cold War.

A few days ago in my American History class, I lectured on the early years of the Cold War of the late 1940s and early 1950s. With rapt attention, young Racer Nation listened to me drone on and on about the Berlin Airlift and the fact that the city would become what I called a “pregnant symbol” of the U.S.-Soviet conflict. 

Earlington Depot
Shelly Baskin / WKMS

The history of many towns in west Kentucky has been shaped, in large part, by the coal companies and railroads that brought in jobs, money, and people. During the golden years of coal and rail in the early 20th century these towns boomed. And when the coal ran out and the trains stopped rolling, they crashed. The city of Earlington, Kentucky is one of those towns.

A new smart-phone app offered by the Kentucky Historical Society allows tourists access to the history behind roadside markers.   The aim is the weave a historical story.  Sally Warfield, who’s a Digital Media Specialist with the Kentucky Historical Society, says the new app connects communities by demonstrating their shared history.

Product Description:

Here is the impetuous young officer whose miraculous survival in combat half-convinced him that he could not be killed. Here is the free-spending landowner whose debts to English merchants instilled him with a prickly resentment of imperial power. We see the general who lost more battles than he won and the reluctant president who tried to float above the partisan feuding of his cabinet. His Excellency is a magnificent work, indispensable to an understanding not only of its subject but also of the nation he brought into being.

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