historic preservation

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Downtown Paducah's Columbia Theatre is in the early stages of rebirth, or that's what members of the Columbia Club hope. The massive theatre first opened to the public in 1927 and has been deteriorating since its last show in 1987. The estimated cost to renovate the space is six million dollars, which the club hopes to raise through grants and local investors. Matt Markgraf takes us on a tour of the building while he lends a hand on a recent clean-up day.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The Kentucky Heritage Council, Preservation Kentucky Inc. the Kentucky Main Street Program and Paducah Main Street invite the public to a full day of information and discussion about the historic preservation of downtown Paducah this Saturday at Maiden Alley Cinema and the River Discovery Center. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Kentucky Heritage Council's executive director and state historic preservation officer Craig Potts about the conference, focusing on revitalizing downtown neighborhoods.

legendaryshackshakers.com

On October 18, WKMS is broadcasting live from Paducah's Oktoberfest, including a performance of by the Legendary Shack Shakers. Frontman JD Wilkes has spoken with Todd Hatton about his recent book, Barn Dances and Jamborees across Kentucky. On Sounds Good, he speaks with Kate Lochte about the band's "New Testament Tour," how he divides his creative time between two bands (he also fronts The Dirt Daubers) and his thoughts on uncovering an historic mural in downtown Paducah.

Fisk University Archives, Nashville, Tennessee

The Tennessee Historical Commission will start taking grant applications for historic preservation projects for next year starting tomorrow.

Officials say the amount of funds available for grants in Tennessee is expected to be about $200,000.

The selection progress will emphasize projects such as architectural and archaeological surveys, design guidelines for historic districts and the rehabilitation of historic buildings.