Hillary Clinton

The first presidential debate was a tense affair between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they clashed over their economic and trade plans, national security and race relations in the U.S.

The Republican nominee came out aggressively against Clinton, often interrupting her and talking over her, but the Democratic nominee didn't pull her punches either and had plenty of zingers ready. And as the night wore on, Trump appeared repeatedly rattled as he was pressed on his past support for the birther movement and controversial comments about women.

The first presidential debate tonight is shaping up to be one of the most-watched political events ever, with a potentially Super Bowl-size audience.

Here are four things to watch for as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump take the stage at Hofstra University on Long Island.

1. Which Trump shows up

Donald Trump "won" the primary debates by dominating his opponents, often by name-calling and bluster. This one will be different.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

LISTEN: The Making of Clinton and Trump

Sep 21, 2016
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The 2016 presidential campaign has in many ways become a question of character. Even though Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have incredibly loyal supporters, the two candidates also inspire some intensely negative feelings among voters. Clinton and Trump are the two most unpopular candidates since modern polling began.

The first presidential debate, to be held next Monday, Sept. 26, at Hofstra University in New York, will be divided into three 30-minute segments on three topics, according to the Commission On Presidential Debates co-chairman, Frank Fahrenkopf.

That's a bit different from the original announcement for the first debate, which said there would be six 15-minute segments. Farhrenkopf told NPR that it was moderator Lester Holt's decision to combine the segments.

The topics will be: the Direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America.

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin said Wednesday that his recent speech containing remarks about shedding blood was a warning against American apathy.

Rob Canning, WKMS / Fancy Farm, Bevin

Update: Gov. Bevin's comments have drawn fire from Kentucky Democrats. See below.  

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says blood might be shed if Democrat Hillary Clinton is elected president.  

Peeradach Rattanakoses, 123rf Stock Photo

This fall Tennessee students will vote for president of the United States. The Secretary of State’s office said Thursday they will hold the first statewide Student Mock Election. 

Brian Clardy via Facebook

Dr. Brian Clardy is a delegate from Calloway County at the DNC and a Murray State history professor. He speaks with Matt Markgraf about Clinton's speech and the message he will bring back to western Kentucky voters and how he might use his experience from the convention as a teaching tool in the classroom.

WKMS File Photo

At this week’s Democratic National Convention, two presidents ran blocks for Hillary Clinton on an issue that has crippled her favorability in Appalachia: coal.

Both President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton brought up coal in their speeches endorsing Hillary’s presidential bid.

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