heroin

Angelo Alonzo, a resident of Portland, Maine, says he nearly died last month after injecting what he believed to be a safe dose of heroin — the same amount he's taken before. But this time, he says, the drug knocked him to his knees.

"An amount that usually gives me a good mellow high was just way too much," he says, "and I woke up in the shower and I was cold. And I didn't put myself there."

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

Some health departments in western Kentucky area are mulling the possibility of implementing needle exchange programs to stem transmission of bloodborne diseases like HIV and Hepititus C.

In March, Gov. Beshear signed SB 192, also known as the heroin bill, which gives local health departments the option of starting a program allowing addicts to swap out dirty needles for clean ones.

Earlier this week, Lousiville began the process of starting its own program and while needle use of drugs like heroin is more prevalent in other parts of the state, health officials are starting to take a look at whether the need for a program is great enough in our area.

LRC Public Information

Formation is underway of a task force that will oversee implementation of the state's new heroin law.  The co-chair of the task force says he witnessed heroin's rise in popularity in his community just over five years ago.

M / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

A drug that can reverse the effects of heroin and other opioid overdoses is now available without a prescription in Kentucky. 

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

One of the most significant pieces of legislation to come out of this year’s General Assembly session aims to curtail Kentucky’s heroin epidemic. 

lrc.state.ky.us

State lawmakers worked into the early hours Wednesday to pass a series of bills before the Kentucky legislative session draws to a close. Lawmakers passed a comprehensive bill to address the state’s growing heroin problem, set a floor to the tumbling gas tax and extended protections domestic violence victims.

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky lawmakers say they’ve come a long way in coming up with a legislative solution to the state’s heroin epidemic, but no consensus has emerged on the biggest sticking point—how to punish heroin traffickers.

Kyhealthnow / Facebook

More Kentuckians are insured, protected from second-hand smoke and making healthier lifestyle choices, according to a recently released preliminary report on Gov. Steve Beshear’s kyhealthnow initiative.

LRC Public Information

Many Kentucky lawmakers are probably a bit worn out after another late night session in Frankfort Wednesday. It's become a tradition for state legislators to work a long day right before the end of the session break.

RXUYDC, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky General Assembly adjourned late Wednesday night for a week and a half while Gov. Steve Beshear considers vetoes—and no bill addressing the state’s rising heroin problems had been passed.

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