heroin

Official Photo/ag.ky.gov

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear plans to announce an initiative to combat opioid overdoses and deaths.

Courtesy White House video.

Now that the president has officially declared the opioid crisis a health emergency, many people are wondering how that will help in the nation’s hardest hit region: the Ohio Valley. Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia collectively have an overdose death rate that is twice the national average. Aaron Payne of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports on some potentially helpful parts of the President’s plan and one big thing that’s missing. 

Oleg Dudko - 123rf Stock Photo

Health officials say Tennessee saw a record number of overdose deaths in 2016.

Stu Johnson, WEKU

Prosecutors from across Kentucky were briefed Thursday on the state’s heroin problem through the eyes of representatives of crime lab, medical, drug recovery, and other government agencies.

J. Tyler Franklin | wfpl.org

A presidential commission on the opioid crisis delivered its first report last week. Among the recommendations: better sharing of data. Health researchers warn that they don’t have some information critical to addressing the deadliest drug crisis in the country’s history. Some efforts are underway in the Ohio Valley to fill some of the gaps.

The number of new Hepatitis C cases leaped nearly 300 percent from 2010 to 2015, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the CDC points to the likely culprit behind the spike in cases of the infectious disease: the use of heroin and other injection drugs.

Kentucky State Police

Kentucky State Police have seized $1.5 million worth of heroin during a traffic stop in Lyon County Monday evening. 

Rebecca Kiger

We’ve heard the statistics on the region’s heroin crisis, and how many have fallen into addiction. But one person’s story can tell a lot about what it takes to get out. As part of an occasional series on the Affordable Care Act, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores how the law expanded substance abuse treatment for thousands, including Wendy Crites. Producers Glynis Board and Rebecca Kiger bring us the story of Crites’ struggle for sobriety, told in her own words.

Joseph Lord

The Kentucky Senate has voted to make all trafficking in heroin or Fentanyl Class C felonies. Proponents hope the change would result in fewer overdose deaths.

Courtesy Nationwide Children’s Hospital

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis is reaching a new generation as the number of drug affected babies rises at an astonishing rate. 

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