heroin

Author: Intropin (Shared via Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license) [Wikimedia]

Kentucky schools could provide another tool in the state’s fight against heroin. 

The pharmaceutical company AdaptPharma is donating the antidote Narcan, also known as Naloxone, to Kentucky schools. 

Rand Paul, via Wikimedia Commons

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky says Congress is close to approving a bill that will help combat heroin addiction in his home state. 

Speaking at a medical town hall in Bowling Green today, the Republican lawmaker said federal restrictions have too often stood in the way of giving heroin users effective treatment for their addictions. 

Jan Fidler, 123rf Stock Photo

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell visited a Louisville organization Tuesday to talk about federal legislation that would help boost substance abuse treatment programs across the country.

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

  Legislation to expand penalties for heroin trafficking is on its way to the Kentucky House.  The measure got overwhelming support in the state senate Wednesday.

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths.

State lawmakers approved the bill at the close of the legislative session. Now, they’re beginning to look at the next steps to address what’s been described as an epidemic of heroin abuse in Kentucky.

Illinois lawmakers set aside their bitter partisan bickering Wednesday to override Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's partial veto of bill addressing the state's heroin crisis.

Angelo Alonzo, a resident of Portland, Maine, says he nearly died last month after injecting what he believed to be a safe dose of heroin — the same amount he's taken before. But this time, he says, the drug knocked him to his knees.

"An amount that usually gives me a good mellow high was just way too much," he says, "and I woke up in the shower and I was cold. And I didn't put myself there."

Eric Molina, Wikimedia Commons

Some health departments in western Kentucky area are mulling the possibility of implementing needle exchange programs to stem transmission of bloodborne diseases like HIV and Hepititus C.

In March, Gov. Beshear signed SB 192, also known as the heroin bill, which gives local health departments the option of starting a program allowing addicts to swap out dirty needles for clean ones.

Earlier this week, Lousiville began the process of starting its own program and while needle use of drugs like heroin is more prevalent in other parts of the state, health officials are starting to take a look at whether the need for a program is great enough in our area.

LRC Public Information

Formation is underway of a task force that will oversee implementation of the state's new heroin law.  The co-chair of the task force says he witnessed heroin's rise in popularity in his community just over five years ago.

M / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

A drug that can reverse the effects of heroin and other opioid overdoses is now available without a prescription in Kentucky. 

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