healthcare

The Capitol Hill health care fight sure seemed dead. After Republican proposals to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, failed to pass a Republican-controlled Congress, lawmakers looked poised to move on to other topics, like a tax overhaul. But this week, proposals from both the left and the right are grabbing headlines.

feverpitched, 123rf Stock Photo

Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield officials said on Wednesday the company will no longer offer health insurance plans in 61 counties in Kentucky in 2018. 

A popular federal-state program that provides health coverage to millions of children in lower- and middle-class families is up for renewal Sept. 30.

official photo, public domain

The chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee says both parties must be willing to compromise to achieve a deal that would strengthening the country's individual health insurance markets.

Foundation For a Healthy Kentucky via Facebook

With Kentucky struggling with health issues from lung cancer to opioid addiction, the president and CEO of Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky payed a visit to the Purchase Area early this week to discuss regional wellness. Matt Markgraf speaks with former Democratic Congressman Ben Chandler about tobacco, opioids, health accessibility and politics.

With Republican efforts to "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act stalled, tentative bipartisan initiatives are in the works to stabilize the fragile individual insurance market that serves roughly 17 million Americans.

Congress and the Trump administration could boost insurance coverage by a couple of million people and lower premiums by taking a few actions to stabilize the Affordable Care Act insurance markets, according to a new analysis by the consulting firm Oliver Wyman.

The health insurer Aetna is facing criticism for revealing the HIV status of potentially thousands of customers after it sent out a mailer in which information about ordering prescription HIV drugs was clearly visible through the envelope's clear window.

For example, in a letter sent to a customer in Brooklyn, N.Y., the window revealed considerably more than the address. It also showed the beginning of a letter advising the customer about options "when filling prescriptions for HIV Medic ... "

Women have a lot at stake in the fight over the future of health care.

Do I have to pay the health law's so-called "Cadillac tax" because I have good health insurance? When can I get Trumpcare plans for my kids? And what can I do if my insurance plan choices don't include a specialist who is the only doctor in the area that can treat my cancer? Here are the answers to some recent questions about health insurance from readers.

Pages