health insurance

There's new — and shocking — evidence about the toll that health care costs are taking on the world's most vulnerable.

This post was updated Dec. 14 at 9:30 a.m. to note that Maryland extended enrollment until Dec. 22.

Gene Kern, 63, retired early from Fujifilm, where he sold professional videotape. "When the product became obsolete, so did I," he says, "and that's why I retired."

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Wednesday was the first day to buy health insurance on Healthcare.gov in Kentucky. For about 80% of Kentuckians who buy a plan on the individual market, prices might actually go down.

Starting next week, Americans will again be able to shop for health plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces. Open enrollment in most states runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15.

Medicare.gov via Twitter

In April 2018, Medicare officials will begin sending out new health insurance cards that no longer include enrollees’ social security numbers.

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  The Hopkinsville-Christian County League Of Women Voters held a forum this week with health care experts from different backgrounds to tackle why health costs are rising in the U.S.

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Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield officials said on Wednesday the company will no longer offer health insurance plans in 61 counties in Kentucky in 2018. 

A popular federal-state program that provides health coverage to millions of children in lower- and middle-class families is up for renewal Sept. 30.

Natalia Merzlyakova 123rf Stock Photo

  The Hopkinsville-Christian County League of Women Voters is holding an informational forum this month on the rising costs of health care.

Congress and the Trump administration could boost insurance coverage by a couple of million people and lower premiums by taking a few actions to stabilize the Affordable Care Act insurance markets, according to a new analysis by the consulting firm Oliver Wyman.

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