Gun Rights

Nicole Erwin / WKMS

Jeff Dysinger's daughter survived two bullets from a classmate at her Kentucky high school this year, but he hasn't joined in the national outcry over guns that escalated after 17 people died in a Florida school shooting three weeks later.

Gun rights demonstrators rallied at state capitols across the U.S. Saturday to show support for gun ownership. A group called The National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans created Facebook events for pro-gun gatherings in all 50 states, and its co-founder David Clayton told The Associated Press that organizers secured permits for rallies in 45 states. It has been three weeks since Parkland, Fla.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, responding to this past weekend's March For Our Lives events across the nation, is proposing what some might call a radical solution to prevent further gun violence — repealing the Second Amendment.

"March for Our Guns" organizer Brent Webber opened the rally in Helena, Mont., on Saturday with a fiery speech: "Our freedoms come first. No one will infringe on our right to keep and bear arms."

Webber spoke to hundreds of people gathered near the steps of the state Capitol. They were there in response to calls for stricter gun control measures at "March for Our Lives" rallies in Montana and across the country.

Similar pro-gun marches were held in Utah, Idaho and other states.

Nicole Erwin, WKMS

The rain wasn’t enough to keep hundreds of people from showing up to rally for stricter gun laws and safer schools in Marshall County on Saturday. The west Kentucky March For Our Lives event was in solidarity with demonstrations that took place across the country.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

Gun culture runs deep in much of the Ohio Valley, where hunting is a revered tradition and the majority of state lawmakers in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia boast “A” ratings from the National Rifle Association.

A musician and hunting guide running for Congress as a Democrat, arguing for gun regulation. A gun-owning doctor who treated victims of a school shooting, and never wants to do it again. Student shooting survivors who support the Second Amendment and have joined the "Never Again" movement.

When they stand up to address the crowd at a "March for Our Lives" rally in western Kentucky on Saturday, they won't just be pushing for changes in policy.

Alabama Sen. Doug Jones delivered his maiden speech on the Senate floor on Wednesday, tackling a topic that would seem anathema to most Southern Democrats — gun control.

While the U.S. continues to debate what, if any, federal firearms restrictions to enact in the wake of last month's deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school, Canada is introducing new gun laws of its own, even as opponents there have vowed to fight those changes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal party government has proposed what it bills as "common sense gun laws," including tougher background checks and more thorough screening of people with a history of violence.

The Justice Department has taken the first step in banning the sale, manufacture or possession of bump stocks through new regulation, as Congress stalls in drafting a legislative prohibition.

Pages