gun laws

Updated 3:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Florida has decided that the National Rifle Association cannot use pseudonyms for teenagers who want to buy guns as part of a legal challenge against new gun laws in Florida.

The judge expressed sympathy for the teenagers, acknowledging that they probably would suffer extreme harassment if their names were public. But, he wrote with evident reluctance, the law was clear that pseudonyms were not allowed.

Political ads in Georgia's Republican gubernatorial primary this year may be the most charged of any intraparty battle around the country, especially when it comes to guns.

One ad shows former state Sen. Hunter Hill at a shooting range loading one gun, eyes steady on the camera, and firing another.

"We don't need a carry permit," Hill says in the ad. "The only thing we need as Americans is the U.S. Constitution. And as governor, I won't give an inch on our Second Amendment."

Nicole Erwin / WKMS

Jeff Dysinger's daughter survived two bullets from a classmate at her Kentucky high school this year, but he hasn't joined in the national outcry over guns that escalated after 17 people died in a Florida school shooting three weeks later.

The gun issue is beginning to wane in voters' minds ahead of the November midterm elections, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

While almost half of all registered voters (46 percent) say a candidate's position on gun policy will be a major factor in deciding whom to vote for, that number is down 13 points from February, when a shooting at a Florida high school sparked outrage.

Wasin Pummarin, 123RF Stock Photo

A bill that would arm some school teachers in Tennessee failed Tuesday after heated debate from state lawmakers, including several Republican gun rights advocates.

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, responding to this past weekend's March For Our Lives events across the nation, is proposing what some might call a radical solution to prevent further gun violence — repealing the Second Amendment.

"March for Our Guns" organizer Brent Webber opened the rally in Helena, Mont., on Saturday with a fiery speech: "Our freedoms come first. No one will infringe on our right to keep and bear arms."

Webber spoke to hundreds of people gathered near the steps of the state Capitol. They were there in response to calls for stricter gun control measures at "March for Our Lives" rallies in Montana and across the country.

Similar pro-gun marches were held in Utah, Idaho and other states.

A musician and hunting guide running for Congress as a Democrat, arguing for gun regulation. A gun-owning doctor who treated victims of a school shooting, and never wants to do it again. Student shooting survivors who support the Second Amendment and have joined the "Never Again" movement.

When they stand up to address the crowd at a "March for Our Lives" rally in western Kentucky on Saturday, they won't just be pushing for changes in policy.

While the U.S. continues to debate what, if any, federal firearms restrictions to enact in the wake of last month's deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school, Canada is introducing new gun laws of its own, even as opponents there have vowed to fight those changes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal party government has proposed what it bills as "common sense gun laws," including tougher background checks and more thorough screening of people with a history of violence.

BankingBum, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

This week in Frankfort, the debate over gun control flared up again after a mass shooting at a school in Florida. Lawmakers have proposed a handful of bills to deal with guns this legislative session, but most of them expand where guns can be carried. 

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