gun laws

This year, Tennessee joined 21 other states that allow employees to leave guns in their cars in the office parking lot. The laws have left many employers debating how best to ensure safety at work.

After Georgia passed its law allowing employees to keep firearms in their employers' parking lots, Sally Roberts installed a sign on her newspaper firm's door. It read: "No Weapons Allowed."

A job candidate once threatened her, says Roberts, human resources director at Morris Communications. "She did become violent, and I'm very thankful she did not have a weapon."


Earlier this month, Georgia lawmakers passed a sweeping gun bill, known as the "guns everywhere bill" allowing licensed owners to carry firearms in many churches, bars, and government buildings. One of the provisions allows school districts to let teachers carry guns. Commentator Celia Brewer draws on a personal experience when living in New Orleans to express her concern over expanding gun rights.


Illinois State Police has posted on its website a list of approved concealed carry firearms training curricula. The list has all skills required by the Illinois Firearm Concealed Carry Act.

It includes firearm safety; basic principles of marksmanship; care, cleaning, loading and unloading of a concealable firearm and transportation of a firearm.

Tennessee lawmakers came into the legislative session fired up about rejecting new federal gun laws. Even symbolic shots are failing to get support.

A shot at nullifying federal gun laws in Tennessee died in the state Senate Wednesday. A vocal committee chairman sped along debate and ultimately cast the deciding vote.

Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown is a lawyer by training and the newly appointed chair of the Judiciary Committee. He took a personal interest in blocking legislation that would make it a felony for agents to enforce federal gun laws. To make his point, he laid out stark terms.

 “This is a bill that says our individual sheriff’s deputies will be going out and using deadly force of the law of Tennessee to potentially shoot and kill federal authorities for enforcing U.S. Supreme Court decisions,” Kelsey said.