Government

Jacob Ryan-WFPL/Kentucky Public Radio

If lawmakers fail to pass a state budget by the end of the legislative session on Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin says he won’t call a special legislative session to give them more time.

If a two-year budget doesn’t pass by June 30th, the state will be thrown into a partial government shutdown.

Nattayanee Darath, 123rf

Update April 12:

A sponsor of a Tennessee transgender bathroom bill has told a finance committee that he has to consider a state attorney general's opinion before going forward. 

Wasin Pummarin, 123rf Stock Photo

A Tennessee bill that would allow mental health therapists to turn patients away based on the counselors' religious beliefs and personal principles has passed and is on its way to the governor.

Screenshot, via ky.gov

As Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration and a private consulting firm work to fix Benefind, the troubled one-stop portal for health and social services in Kentucky, the blame game over who’s responsible for its problematic rollout continues.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky lawmakers have agreed to extend the deadline for approving a two-year operating budget of more than $65 billion for state and federal services.

Facebook - Whitney H. Westerfield

West Powell, a man convicted of stealing car radios 27 years ago changed Republican State Senator Whitney Westerfield’s mind on expungement. 

Ryland Barton, WFPL

Kentucky's Democratic attorney general Andy Beshear has sued Republican Governor Matt Bevin. Beshear says Bevin overstepped his authority when he ordered budget cuts for state colleges and universities without legislative approval. 

Bevin Asks Lawmakers to Extend Budget Deadline

Apr 11, 2016
LRC Public Information

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is pleading with lawmakers to extend their deadline for approving a two-year state spending plan.

LRC Public Information

After hours of negotiations on Sunday, state lawmakers once again failed to agree on a budget, halting their meeting abruptly at about 11:30 p.m.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

House Democrats say they would agree to spend less on state colleges and universities if it means lawmakers could reach an agreement on a two-year plan to spend more than $65 billion in public money. 

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