Rand Paul is trying to have it both ways — running both for president and re-election to his Kentucky Senate seat in 2016.

But whether he'll be able to keep that electoral insurance policy rests in the hands of Kentucky Republicans this weekend.

Kentucky law is clear: You can't run for president and U.S. Senate at the same time. But Paul has tried to get around that law, by pushing for the state to hold a nonbinding caucus instead of a primary in the presidential nominating process.

Gage Skidmore, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 2.0

The state’s Republican Party leaders will vote in about two weeks on plans to hold a caucus instead of a presidential primary next year. 

The caucus is aimed at allowing Senator Rand Paul to run for both president and his senate seat simultaneously.

Republican Party of Kentucky chairman and executive director Steve Robertson is stepping down after this November’s election.

Mike Biagi - a field representative for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell - will succeed Robertson. Biagi will take over Robertson’s executive director duties next month.

One day after GOP candidates gave their party control of both chambers of Congress, presumptive Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate "needs to be fixed" — and that he and his Republican colleagues are willing to work with President Obama on some issues.

We'll update this post with news from McConnell's appearance in Louisville, Ky.

Update at 2:25 p.m. ET: On Obama And The Veto Threat

Rand Paul Says Republicans Could Gain Ky. House Majority

Oct 30, 2012
Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky U. S. Senator Rand Paul showed support for Kentucky House of Representative candidates today at the McCracken County Republican Headquarters in Paducah. During a small, early-morning gathering for local residents, headquarters officials introduced Richard Heath and Jason Crockett, who are running for the 2nd and 3rd district seats, respectively.