Gina Haspel

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

10:46 a.m.

President Donald Trump is at CIA headquarters for the swearing-in of the agency's next director. Trump traveled to agency headquarters in Langley, Virginia Monday. Gina Haspel won Senate confirmation last week after overcoming concerns about her role in the agency's use of harsh interrogation techniques after 9/11.

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Gina Haspel as CIA director, making her the first woman to lead the spy agency, despite the controversy surrounding her role in the waterboarding program.

The Senate vote of 54-45 in favor of Haspel came mostly along party lines. She needed support from several Democratic senators to win confirmation.

The Senate intelligence committee voted 10-5 Wednesday to recommend Gina Haspel as CIA director despite the controversy surrounding her role in the agency's waterboarding program.

The full Senate now appears all but certain to confirm Haspel within the next week or so, which would make her the first woman to lead the CIA.

Her confirmation also would complete President Trump's recent shakeup of his national security and foreign policy teams.

President Trump's nominee for the head of the CIA, Gina Haspel, was questioned this week by the Senate intelligence committee about her role in the agency's interrogation program after the Sept. 11 attacks.

"Under my leadership, on my watch, CIA will not restart a detention and interrogation program," she told the committee. But many senators believe she did not oppose torture strongly enough, and they pressed her on what her role was in the CIA's interrogation program.

Rand Paul / paul.senate.gov

  Rand Paul still says he will vote against the confirmation of Gina Haspel to be the next director of the CIA, citing her role in the intelligence agency’s brutal interrogation program more than a decade ago.

Gina Haspel's appearance before the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday promises to be a very unusual confirmation hearing.

Most every nominee for a top government job has a long public record that is open for scrutiny. Not so with Haspel, who would be the first woman to lead the CIA.