Gay Rights

Ludovic Bertron, Wikimedia Commons

An online tool with information about Evansville-area businesses and their attitudes towards LGBT customers and employees is looking to expand.

The Map Evansville website is the brainchild of University of Southern Indiana psychology professor Amie McKibban, who asks business owners to fill out a survey, with the results shared online.

Ludovic Bertron, Wikimedia Commons

New polling shows opposition to same sex marriage is growing among Kentucky voters.

According to the most recent Bluegrass Poll, 57 percent of the registered voters surveyed earlier this month said they don’t support same sex marriage. That’s compared to 50 percent last summer.

Allison Crawford

As Alabama becomes the most recent state to issue same sex marriages, some lawmakers there are decrying a federal judge’s decision to strike down the ban and the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to intervene. Kentucky, another largely conservative state, may receive a final decision on its gay marriage ban this summer. The impending decision has some public officials reexamining their role as marriage officiants.

Kentucky high schools aren't the most inviting spaces for LGBT students, according to a study released this week by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, or GLSEN.

The Supreme Court's new term will not include any cases that might decide the issue of same-sex marriage in the U.S., a development that comes after many lower and appeals courts have ruled against states' bans on gay marriage. Advocates on both sides of the issue have been calling for the high court to review the issue and make an official ruling.

The court's refusal of all the petitions related to bans on gay marriage means that the appeals courts' decisions allowing gay marriage can now take effect. They had been on hold pending a potential review by the Supreme Court.

LaSalvia Presents "Homocon" Tonight at Murray State

Mar 31, 2014

Jimmy LaSalvia is longtime political activist and strategist, founder of GOProud - a political action group representing gay conservatives, and frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX News and network TV. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good ahead of his presentation "Homocon: A Gay Conservative's View from the Trenches of the Culture Wars," tonight at 7:30 at Murray State University in the Curris Center's Barkley Room. This event is sponsored by LGBT Programming, MSU Alliance, and the President's Commission on Diversity and Inclusion.

Kentucky's House Bill 171, known as the Statewide Fairness Bill, is gaining traction in Frankfort, recently signing 16 co-sponsors, a record number of sponsors. Murray State's LGBT and URSA Program Coordinator and Vice Chair, President’s Commission on Diversity and Inclusion, Jody Randall joins Kate Lochte to talk more about this bill and the way legislators are beginning to think of discrimination protection for the LGBT community.

The new executive director and CEO of the Blue Grass Council of the Boy Scouts of America is calling the controversy surrounding the impending decision on whether to allow gay members a “tipping point.”

The BSA recently postponed making a final ruling until May. James “Chip” Armishaw says that while he doesn’t have any personal opinions on the issue, he’s confident that when the time comes, the right decision will be made.

Rae Hodge (KPR)

Seeking the passage of three pieces of legislation protecting against discrimination based on sexual orientation, more than 200 people rallied on Wednesday in the Capitol Rotunda with Kentucky's Fairness Campaign. 

Rep. Mary Lou Marzian, a Democrat of Louisville, is  sponsoring a bill that would prevent employers from discriminating against employees based on sexual orientation. The bill, along with Senate Bill 28, would also make it illegal for landlords and real estate agents to discriminate on those grounds.

On May 9th, Barack Obama made history and headlines, becoming the first sitting president to openly support gay marriage. As expected, media outlets jumped on this announcement, a contentious social issue with favorability weighing almost an even split for and against in the polls. Commentator Richard Nelson argues that overall media coverage appeared bias, praising Obama for his “evolution” on the issue, without considering the other 50 percent or so who disagree on the issue. In his commentary, Nelson takes the opposing view and argues that the right recipe for marriage should include God in the mix.

Please note: Commentaries political in nature are solely the opinions of the commentator and do not necessarily reflect the views of WKMS or its staff.