Gardening

Cheryl Davis, 123rf Stock Photo

The Monarch population has rapidly declined in the last 10 years and naturalists are urging people to plant more milkweed and pesticide free nectar plants, which comprise a butterfly waystation. Former president of the Kentucky Garden Association Joanna Kirby calls the Monarch the 'canary in the coal mine' indicating a problem in the environment. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about her monarch waystation efforts and the dedication of three in Paducah and Mayfield this weekend.

Western Kentucky Botanical Garden,

Next week, Western Kentucky Botanical Garden in Owensboro hosts "Dazzling Daylilies - Balloons Over the Garden" featuring talks centered around daylilies and how to hybridize them, a display garden, hot air balloon rides and a release of Japanese lanterns. Susie and Bill Tyler speak with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about the event and the flowers, which Susie Tyler says, "meet or exceed the beauty of roses."

Ky. Governor's Garden, Flickr

The Governor's Garden program began in 2009, inspired by the 'victory garden' at the White House, as a way to encourage people to go back to Kentucky's roots as an agricultural state by growing their own gardens and eating healthier food. For the second year, First Lady Jane Beshear is opening up the Commonwealth Garden Initiative to selected schools, churches, parks and social organizations who are interested in beginning their own community gardens. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Beshear about how to sign up for the initiative and how it provides a means for an organization to give back to its community.

123rf stock photo

Land Between the Lakes invites the public to return the daffodil bulbs displaced by the US68/KY80 highway construction project in March 2007. The volunteer workday is on November 15. There's also an opportunity to plant any daffodils anytime through November 23 at areas marked off by small orange pin flags. Daffodil volunteer coordinator Jan Culwell speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the effort.

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The Arboretum at Murray State University is a fully accessible horticultural display, public garden and educational laboratory located on Pullen Farm, with an entrance at the end of Hickory Drive, off Main Street. Friends of MSU Arboretum Board Chair Paula Edwards visits Sounds Good to talk about its Watermelon Bust coming up July 17th and the Hutson Harvest Gala on September 4 - as well as what's new at the Arboretum this summer. Hear the conversation:

As the much anticipated spring time makes its way across our region, thoughts may turn to bringing that garden back to life. Sandy Lynn of the Calloway County Public Library stops by to tell us about a program on how to build a raised garden bed, what plants to use, type of construction, and more. on March 20 at the library. She also tells us about the Dr. Seuss event and the Animal Tales Program going on at the library, on Sounds Good.

With high temperatures expected to reach the lower to mid 50s this weekend, it might just be warm enough to step outside and give that yard some much needed tender loving care. Pruning during the dormant months is the most common practice, allowing plants ample opportunity to grow in the spring. Murray State Horticulture faculty member Pat Williams addresses pruning in the winter and what to do about ice-damaged trees in a workshop from 1 to 3 Saturday (February 15) afternoon at the Pullen Farm greenhouse at the Murray State Arboretum, on Hickory Drive, off Main Street.

Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening. In this edition of "From the Garden Gate," Roy talks about his visit to The Garden Museum in London. 

The Garden Museum in London

Whenever I teach in England as I did for a month this summer, I always feel as if I’m in a kind of gardeners’ heaven.  This summer I got a chance to visit a museum devoted entirely to gardening.  Located across the River Thames from the Houses of Parliament, the Garden History Museum is housed in the rescued and restored medieval church of St Mary-at-Lambeth.

Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening. In this edition of "From the Garden Gate," Roy talks about the 'vegetative doldrums' of September, and how to prepare for next season.

SEWilco, Wikimedia Commons

This week's From the Garden Gate topic revisits an earlier one, about recommendations for the border of your yard. Murray resident Roy Helton divides his time between teaching in the English Department at Murray State University and indulging his passion for gardening.

Well, here I am, still on the topic of tall plants. Over the years of arranging and rearranging plants and a whole lot of trial and error, I’ve grown fonder of lots of these large plants as the backbone, and even middle ground, of the border.  As my own garden matures, and the beds continue to fill in, these plants serve as a backdrop to set off the shorter flowers in the front.  

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