flu shot

Last year's flu vaccine didn't work very well. This year's version should do a much better job protecting people against the flu, federal health officials said Thursday.

An analysis of the most common strains of flu virus that are circulating in the United States and elsewhere found they match the strains included in this year's vaccine, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Brace yourselves: Flu season is coming. And along with the coughing, fevers and aches, you can expect a lot of unreliable or downright wrong information about the flu vaccine.

Many people underestimate the health risks from flu. Thousands of Americans die from flu-related complications in a typical year, and last season's H1N1 strain hit young adults particularly hard.


Mid September marks a key point in the flu shot season across Kentucky. Health officials are urging all Kentuckians over six months old to get vaccinated.


More than half of Kentucky’s regions have seen an increase in flu outbreaks in the past week prompting the state health department to raise the flu level to widespread. That’s the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s highest level for flu.

State epidemiologist Craig Humbaugh says this year the main strain is H1N1, which first emerged in 2009.


Kentucky has recorded its first two confirmed cases of flu for this season, one of them in Henderson County. 

The two cases of influenza are no indication of how prevalent flu will be the next several months. The other flu case was reported in Jefferson County. State epidemiologist Craig Humbaugh says the flu bug is not an ailment which spreads from county to county necessarily.