fertilizer

Aslie Stevens, via WFPL

A barge that cracked in half on the Ohio River released more than 400,000 gallons (1.5 million liters) of fertilizer, and now the boat's owners say "human error" caused the spill.

kyagr.com

A partnership between LG&E and KU and a Kentucky company could help both the energy and agriculture sectors, Kentucky leaders announced Monday.

Kentucky company Charah  is opening up a facility in Louisville that will takeleftover gypsum from the Mill Creek Power Station and turn it into a sulfur product—such as fertilizers—for Kentucky farmers.

High levels of run-off pollution in a Christian County river that empties into Lake Barkley has officials considering a fertilizer ban there. The Kentucky New Era reports that’s one of the options federal environmental authorities are looking at if the Little River isn’t cleaned of agricultural run-off pollution.