felon voting rights

Sentencing Project

Tuesday was the last day to register to vote in the upcoming election, but a new report from a voting rights advocacy group shows that 1 in 4 black Kentuckians will not be able to participate because of a felony conviction.  


Some Kentuckians with felony convictions would be eligible to have their voting rights restored under a bill that a Senate committee approved on Wednesday.

LRC Public Information

Kentucky House members will consider a constitutional amendment measure this session that would restore voting rights to nonviolent former felons.

It won the approval of the Elections, Constitutional Amendments, and Intergovernmental Affairs Committee Monday. 

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

A key state legislator on the ex-felon voting rights issue says Gov. Matt Bevin contradicted his own logic on two high-profile issues addressed through executive orders.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

  Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin issued five high-profile executive orders on Tuesday on issues ranging from same-sex marriage licenses to voting rights for ex-felons.

“Today, I took action to uphold several commitments I made during my campaign so that we can implement real solutions that will help the people of Kentucky,” Bevin said in a press release.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Outgoing Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear’s executive order last week restoring voting rights for about 180,000 former felons in Kentucky could be a boon for state Democrats, who suffered tough electoral losses this year.


Michael Hiser started taking drugs when he was 8 and was only able to sober up while serving time for a felony.

While in prison, he decided he wanted to vote — an act prohibited for felons in Kentucky.


The Kentucky General Assembly passed several important pieces of legislation in the just-concluded 2015 session, including a comprehensive heroin bill and a freeze to the state’s tumbling gas tax.

Dewayne Neeley / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky lawmakers may once again consider restoring voting rights for those who have committed low-level felony offenses in the next General Assembly session.

Daviess County Rep. Tommy Thompson says he hopes the 2015 legislature will join the majority of other states that give voting rights back to those who have served time for non-violent felonies.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

By law, the only piece of legislation that the 2014  Kentucky General Assembly had to pass was a two-year state budget. All else, as Will Rogers put it, is applesauce.