Fancy Farm

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U.S. Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell said he’ll attend the Fancy Farm picnic next month to help support a one-time rival.

“I’m looking forward to being there,” McConnell said during a stop in Bullitt County Monday.

Other years he’s missed it, but McConnell said that’s only when there isn’t a big state race in play that year.

WKMS/John Null

Presidential hopeful and U.S. Senator Rand Paul says he won’t attend the Fancy Farm political picnic in Graves County next month.

Paul is also running for re-election to his Senate seat next year, and experts say this could prompt future challengers to criticize Paul for not paying attention to his home state while he runs for two offices simultaneously.

Fancy Farm to Vote on Legalization of Wine Sales

Jul 10, 2015
Fancy Farm Vineyard and Winery L.L.C. / Facebook

A special election will be held in Fancy Farm after a vineyard there petitioned to legalize its wine sales. 

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A popular sports talk show host will serve as master of ceremonies for the political speaking at this August’s 135th Fancy Farm Picnic in Graves County.

Matt Jones is the founder of Kentucky Sports Radio, which in recent years has become a forum for politics. It will fall on Jones to manage the often-unruly crowd between speeches as the race to become Kentucky’s next governor will likely dominate the event.

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On August 2, 2014, a record attendance showed up for the 134th Fancy Farm Picnic to hear with classic stump speeches from local and statewide politicians vying for the hotseat. Murray State history professor, commentator and political junkie Dr. Brian Clardy reflects on this year's event, one week later and some of his impressions ahead of the November election.

Kentucky is one of 12 states that have joined a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed greenhouse gas regulations. The lawsuit asks the court of appeals in Washington, D.C., to overturn a previous settlement that forced the EPA to take action.

The much-anticipated 134th Fancy Farm Picnic has come and gone, setting an attendance record in the process, according to organizers. But while the caustic stump speeches get national media attention, many forget its original purpose: raising funds for St. Jerome Catholic Church.

Live Updates From Kentucky's Fancy Farm: Grimes, McConnell Trade Barbs

Aug 2, 2014

  Update 3:45 p.m.: James Comer Is Running for Governor

As he did the day before, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer took jabs at 2015 gubernatorial candidates.

This time, though, he also said he's officially running for governor in 2015.

— JL

Update 3:25 p.m.: McConnell Draws Obama, Grimes Parallels

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Jennifer Moore is Board Chair of Emerge Kentucky, an organization that trains Democratic women to run for political office. Moore is a founding Partner of Grossman & Moore PLLC Injury Lawyers in Louisville. She travels to west Kentucky today to be a part of the KET broadcast of the Fancy Farm Picnic tomorrow and speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about how Emerge Kentucky trains women and her forecast for Fancy Farm.

John Paul Henry

Organizers expect a larger than usual crowd at this weekend's Fancy Farm Picnic in Graves County. The 134 year-old event has evolved from old-timey political stump speeches to a shout-fest as spectators try to overpower the speaker.

In 1975 the Fancy Farm Picnic was a little more refined. In fact, it was quiet enough to hear a flash bulb pop during then-Presidential Candidate George Wallace’s speech. Wallace survived an assassination attempt in 1972 that left him paralyzed below the waist.

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