Facebook

Facebook's mission "to make the world more open and connected" is a familiar refrain among company leaders. But the latest research shows connecting 1.1 billion users around the world may come at a psychological cost.

A new University of Michigan study on college-aged adults finds that the more they used Facebook, the worse they felt. The study, published in the journal PLOS One, found Facebook use led to declines in moment-to-moment happiness and overall life satisfaction.

Wikimedia Commons

A fake account on the Hopkins County School System Facebook page confused some parents trying to get information about school closings Tuesday night. Community Engagement Specialist Lori Harrison is the administrator for the school’s page. Harrison says another account that looked similar to the official one posted inappropriate comments on the site.

Studies have shown that the human brain, for all of its intelligence and reasoning, prefers efficiency.  Or, as a psychology professor of mine once said, "The brain likes it easy."  That could be why we only tend to scan, at best, things like website privacy policies.  And when that involves the world's most ubiquitous social media site, that ignorance can be dangerous.  To find out to improve that state of affairs, Todd Hatton spoke with Murray State University journalism professor Elizabeth Thomas.  She teaches and blogs on the subject of social media.

wikipedia.org

I hope I look that good when I'm 75. (I know, it's a suspension bridge)

NPR reports the Golden Gate Bridge turns 75 this weekend.

Kentucky ~ Our own bridge is open today...who wants to go first? A fugitive was lured into arrest by a facebook profile (that's just like a fake woman). 

the morning cram [the rich friends edition]

May 18, 2012
Moritz Wickendorf, Wikimedia Commons

"...the bull has sent you a friend request."

NPR reports Facebook is only moments away from being publicly traded.

Afternoon Round-Up 5/16/12

May 16, 2012
facebook.com

Today on NPR:For $75, This Guy Will Sell You 1,000 Facebook 'Likes'

Around the Commonwealth:

Kentucky Senate President David Williams says he had no idea what trouble his former gubernatorial running mate Richie Farmer was causing as agriculture commissioner.

The Illinois House wants to bar employers from asking workers and job applicants for access to social media like Facebook.  The legislation passed Thursday and now goes to the Senate.  Some employers, particularly law enforcement, have begun asking for passwords so they can review the online activities of job applicants.  Under the legislation, workers could file lawsuits if pressured to open up private accounts if they're denied a job for refusing. Employers could still ask for usernames to view public information online, and they can monitor work-owned computers.

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