evolution

Courtesy of Dr. Randy Moore

The famed "Scopes monkey trial" pitted two celebrity lawyers against one another, but only one was memorialized outside the Tennessee courthouse where the case unfolded - until now. 

A remarkably complete fossil of a young child suggests that key elements of the human spinal structure were already in place in an ancient human relative 3.3 million years ago.

The child, about three years old, likely died suddenly and quickly drifted into a body of water, where she was covered in sediment that eventually hardened to sandstone, Zeray Alemseged of the University of Chicago tells The Two-Way.

Acoustic biologists who have learned to tune their ears to the sounds of life know there's a lot more to animal communication than just, "Hey, here I am!" or "I need a mate."

From insects to elephants to people, we animals all use sound to function and converse in social groups — especially when the environment is dark, or underwater or heavily forested.

(Photo courtesy of John Scopes, Jr.)

What makes a person voluntarily step into the middle of one of the most controversial and contentious issues of modern times? And what makes them voluntarily step back out?

Western Kentucky native John Thomas Scopes volunteered to be the defendant in a much-ballyhooed trial testing a law he opposed, a law banning the teaching of human evolution in Tennessee. He stood on principle in an intense spotlight... and when the trial was over, he stepped back out, determined to live his own life. But, history was not finished with him just yet.


McCracken County Public Library

John T. Scopes was born and raised in Paducah and is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery. A school teacher, Scopes garnered national recognition as the defendant in the famous "Monkey Trial" in Dayton, Tennessee, for teaching evolution and popularizing the conversation regarding Darwin's theory of evolution. WKMS News Producer and local Morning Edition host Todd Hatton joins Tracy Ross on Sounds Good to talk about his "Evenings Upstairs" presentation about Scopes this Thursday at McCracken County Public Library.

Until about 600 million years ago, seeing colors didn't matter so much to Earth's inhabitants — nobody had eyes.

"Before the eye evolved, you just wouldn't have seen what was there," says Andrew Parker, a biologist at London's Natural History Museum who studies the evolution of color.

The highly publicized debate scheduled for Tuesday in Northern Kentucky between Creation Museum president Ken Ham and  science educator/television personality Bill Nye has sparked critics from both sides.  

Some scientists argue that Nye should not engage the topic of creationism; others say Ham needs the the press to raise money for the development of a Bible-themed amusement park.

Bill Nye.com

MSU’s Presidential Lecturer, Science Guy Bill Nye will debate the founder of Northern Kentucky’s Creation Museum, the day after his speech in Murray.

Education Committee Republicans Question Evolution on State Tests

Aug 16, 2012
http://www.education.ky.gov

A Hopkins County lawmaker is among some state house Republicans questioning whether evolution should be a part of Kentucky’s standardized science tests. The Kentucky interim joint Education Committee debated the topic this week during a discussion of “end-of-course testing.” Republican State Representative Ben Waide of Madisonville says test questions about evolution help promote it as scientific fact and not theory.

Opponents of a Tennessee proposal protecting teachers who allow students to criticize evolution and other scientific theories like global warming are urging Governor Bill Haslam to veto the measure.  Several opponents of the legislation delivered a petition containing more than 3,000 signatures to Haslam spokesman David Smith outside the governor's office Thursday.  Smith told those who brought the petition he would make sure the governor got it.  Haslam says he’ll sign the proposal, which he says encourages critical thinking by protecting teachers from discipline if they help students crit

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