Jorfer, Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Appeals Court in Washington will hear arguments Tuesday in the case West Virginia versus the EPA, challenging the federal Clean Power Plan. That’s the centerpiece of the Obama Administration’s attempt to limit carbon emissions from power plants. 

Cayusa / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6.

Kenn W. Kiser, morgueFile.com

Coal-producing states are preparing for arguments next month in the federal appeals court case known as West Virginia v. EPA, challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Alfred Hofer, 123rf Stock Photo

An Illinois agency will soon collect used tires from abandoned properties and rural roads in an effort to reduce the risk of illnesses carried by some mosquitoes.

Chances are, you've never heard of flubendiamide. It's not among the most toxic insecticides, and it's not among the widely used chemicals, either. In recent years, it has been used on about a quarter of the nation's tobacco and 14 percent of almonds, peppers and watermelons.

Gino Santa Maria, 123rf Stock Photo

Nearly all of Kentucky’s federal representatives have formally filed a document in support of a lawsuit challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s carbon dioxide regulations. 

Wikimedia Commons/Author: PixOnTrax

Kentucky regulators are petitioning the EPA to re-open the public comment period on the federal carbon dioxide rules that were finalized in June.

Arnold Paul, via Wikimedia Commons

  Kentucky on Friday joined 23 other states in a legal challenge against the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulations against carbon dioxide from existing power plants.

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a final version of updated rules intended to keep farmworkers from being poisoned by pesticides. The previous "worker protection standard" for farms has been in effect since 1992.

Governor's Office

  Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear was unclear Tuesday evening about whether his Energy and Environment Cabinet would continue working on a plan to help the state comply with the Environmental Protection Agency’s final Clean Power Plan, which it released the day before.