Environment

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

In our monthly "Puppies Sound Good" segment, we met Beasley today, a scruffy and very friendly puppy up for adoption at the Humane Society of Calloway County. Todd Hatton speaks with Executive Director Kathy Hodge about Beasley and upcoming events: paint your pet night and an animal academy day camp for kids. 

snehit, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky’s Department for Environmental Protection has long relied on paper for a lot of its record-keeping. In the DEP’s building in Frankfort, the file room is huge — full of never-ending rows of cabinets and documents.

ORSANCO logo, via City of Paducah Kentucky Government on Facebook

Volunteers across six states gather along the shore of the Ohio River for an annual ‘sweep’ next weekend. The ‘Ohio River Sweep’ is a cleanup effort spreading more than 3,000 miles. 

Mr.Smith Chetanachan, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is expecting a busier-than-usual mosquito spraying season.

While state officials have reported only a handful of infections, fears of the Zika virus have the department ramping up operations.

Martin Molcan, 123rf Stock Photo

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

As the region reaches the peak summer season for crop acreage reporting, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is streamlining the process so farmers and ranchers can participate in crop insurance programs.

Monarch butterflies are disappearing.

Populations of these distinctive black and orange migratory insects have been in precipitous decline for the past 20 years, but scientists aren't exactly sure what's causing them to vanish.

iStockPhoto

More than 100 coal miners from converge in southern Illinois next week to test their rescue skills. The fifth annual Mine Rescue Skills Competition is June 7 and 8 at Southeastern Illinois University in Harrisburg. 

Flowers generate weak electric fields, and a new study shows that bumblebees can actually sense those electric fields using the tiny hairs on their fuzzy little bodies.

"The bumblebees can feel that hair bend and use that feeling to tell the difference between flowers," says Gregory Sutton, a Royal Society University Research Fellow at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

Matthewjparker, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0

State officials are warning anyone spending time on Illinois lakes and rivers to watch out for a type of rapidly growing algae that can cause illness and other health problems. 

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